Stephan Savoia, Associated Press
Patriots QB Tom Brady was named AP Offensive Player of the Year on Tuesday

Just like all those wins, the NFL awards keep rolling in for Tom Brady.

The league's Most Valuable Player added The Associated Press 2007 Offensive Player of the Year honors to his collection Tuesday, easily outdistancing his main weapon on the unbeaten New England Patriots, Randy Moss.

Indeed, of the four players who received votes from a nationwide panel of 50 media members who regularly cover the NFL, three were Patriots. Brady, of course, led the way, just as he did through the first 16-0 regular season in league history.

"We set out a bunch of goals early in the season," Brady said, "and I think I said the best part about playing quarterback here is I just have to do my job, show up every day and work hard just like everybody else. I think my job description is just a bit different than everybody else's, but there's a lot of satisfaction knowing that I can just come out there and worry about myself and expect that everybody else is going to do their job.

"It's been a fun season. There's no doubt about it."

And it's been a rewarding season for Brady, the first New England player to be chosen MVP and now the first Patriot to win Offensive Player of the Year. He collected 35 1/2 votes to 12 1/2 for Moss. Wes Welker, the Patriots' other starting receiver, got one, as did Green Bay quarterback Brett Favre.

Brady, an eight-year veteran who's already a winner of three Super Bowls, threw for 50 touchdowns, beating Peyton Manning's league mark by one. He also threw 23 of those TD passes to Moss, lifting the receiver past Jerry Rice's record of 22.

NINERS HIRE MARTZ: Mike Martz claims he can put together a fantastic offense with mostly the same San Francisco 49ers who made up the NFL's worst unit in 2007. It's just the type of brash confidence everybody expects from Martz — and Mike Nolan believes every word of it. Nolan hired Martz to be his offensive coordinator Tuesday, tasking one of the NFL's most polarizing coaches with reinventing an offense that sank to historic lows last season.

EX-BEARS COACH DOOLEY DIES AT 77: Jim Dooley, who succeeded George Halas as head coach of the Chicago Bears, died Tuesday, his daughter said. He was 77. Lisa Trace said her father, who coached the Bears from 1968-71, had been ill with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, for the past 10 years and died at Lake Forest Hospital on Tuesday afternoon. Dooley spent nearly three decades with the Bears as a wide receiver, head coach and later as an assistant coach alongside Mike Ditka.