PROVO — Hundreds of students in west and southwest Provo will attend new elementary schools next year, after the Provo School District Board of Education changed elementary school boundaries Tuesday night.

The new boundaries affect Spring Creek, Franklin, Sunset View, Amelia Earhart and Westridge elementary schools, as well as a new school that will open in the Lakeview neighborhood.

The boundaries can be viewed on the district's Web site:

In October, the school board voted to close Grandview Elementary in the spring. As a result, new boundaries had to be drawn for the west part of town.

School district officials also decided to divide about 100 students who live in the Boulders apartment complex among three schools. District officials have described some of the families as being low-income for generations. The students are currently attending Sunset View Elementary.

They school board was to decide the boundaries of the Boulders students and others in southwest Provo in November but was unable to vote on the issue because dozens of parents who were affected by the previous month's proposed boundary adjustments complained to the board for more than an hour.

So on Tuesday, the board tied up ends of October's boundary decisions as well changing southwest boundaries.

Numerous parents expressed happiness with the results of the boundary map approved Tuesday.

"I want to thank the board for listening to and considering the things that were bought up, and I apologize that it could have possibly been done in a more timely manner," resident Aaron Black said.

No one from the Boulders spoke publicly at the meeting. Some of the residents do not speak English.

All school board members voted in favor of the new boundaries except for Sandy Packard.

Packard was opposed to the plan because she didn't feel the process of drawing the southwest boundaries was transparent enough.

She also is disappointed that at Franklin Elementary the new boundaries put the percentage of students who receive free and reduced lunch at 75 percent, "the rate at which research shows academic quality starts to deteriorate," Packard said.