The star witness in the case against polygamist sect leader Warren Jeffs said she wants to create a fund for girls leaving the Fundamentalist LDS Church, not profit off the so-called "prophet."

"My goal is not for money. My goal is to give young girls and women the opportunity I didn't have as a 14-year-old girl being forced and placed into that kind of position," Elissa Wall said during an appearance Monday on ABC's "Good Morning America."

Wall filed a multimillion-dollar civil lawsuit against Jeffs and the FLDS Church before she went to Washington County authorities to report her claims of rape. A proposed settlement calling for a $1 million emergency fund for girls leaving the FLDS Church was reported by the Deseret Morning News last week.

Wall was married at age 14 to her 19-year-old cousin, Allen Steed, in a Nevada motel room ceremony that was presided over by Jeffs. It was her compelling testimony that led to Jeffs' conviction on charges of rape as an accomplice, a first-degree felony. A rape charge has also been filed against Steed based on his testimony for the defense in Jeffs' trial.

Wall's appearance on the morning show did not reveal much that she didn't already say on the witness stand and in a post-verdict news conference. She sought to clarify that she was not out for money, as was portrayed during Jeffs' trial.

As pictures of her wedding day were flashed on the screen, Wall described her feelings of being married to her cousin.

"I was very young at the time, so it was overwhelming and extremely scary," she said. "By that point I was just numb and I was a young 14-year-old trying to just do what everyone told me to do."

Wall, who is now 21, has changed her name again. Her attorneys have said she and her current husband, Lamont Barlow, live in a sort-of "witness protection program."

Jeffs, 51, is scheduled to be sentenced on Nov. 20.

"I think that if Warren Jeffs was to receive one month in jail for every family he destroyed — and I mean a family unit — I think he would spend the rest of his life in jail," Barlow said.