Attorney General Janet Reno fainted during a church service Sunday and was taken to a hospital, where she was reported in good condition.

Reno, 60, was expected to remain overnight for monitoring in the coronary unit at Georgetown University Medical Center, said Paul Katz, the center's chief operating officer. She canceled a trip to New York on Monday where she had planned to tour a school and give a speech."This is just a fainting spell. Her condition is good," Katz said, adding that Reno was joking and in good spirits. Katz said her heart rhythm, EKG, heart rate, respiration and blood pressure were good.

Reno told her staff she was feeling fine and looked forward to returning to work. She read work materials and spoke with family members Sunday afternoon.

She was disappointed that the hospital television did not receive cable, preventing her from watching some final games of the baseball regular season. She asked if either Mark McGwire or Sammy Sosa had hit any home runs Sunday and was subsequently told that McGwire had hit his 69th, her spokesman, Bert Brandenburg, said.

President Clinton spoke with Reno from Air Force One while flying from Los Angeles to San Antonio.

Katz said Reno fainted at Full Gospel AME Church in suburban Clinton, Md., an hour and 15 minutes after the service began. Brandenburg said she felt nauseous while standing, sat down, fainted briefly and recovered but continued to feel nauseous.

Dr. Rodney Ellis, a physician at Georgetown University Medical Center who is a member of the congregation, examined Reno and advised that she be taken to the hospital, the Justice Department statement said. He accompanied her there.

Reno had a similar fainting spell while attending a conference in Mexico City in November 1997. Doctors attributed that fainting to exhaustion and dehydration.

At the time, the attorney general was in the midst of several crucial decisions on whether to name an independent counsel to look into campaign fund raising in the 1996 election. She also had just gotten a memo from FBI Director Louis Freeh recommended that course, which she ultimately rejected.

Reno suffers from the mildest form of Parkinson's disease, which occasionally causes her left hand to shake. Katz said Reno otherwise was in good health.