There were some cheeseburgers flying at The Canyons Thursday night. And no, it wasn't a food fight. It was just some harm-less fun between Steve Mil-ler and his fans.

During the middle of the pop-rock of "Livin' in the U.S.A.," Miller, as he has done many times in the past shouted, "Somebody get me a cheeseburger!" And about 10 audience members obliged.But burgers weren't the only thing soaring during the show. Miller, a man with a keen sense of what a pop song should sound like, cranked out some high-note blues and good-time melodies.

Anyone who has seen the self-proclaimed "Space Cowboy" in action would have noticed the set was pretty much the usual.

The hits "Abracadabra," "Swingtown" and the extended version of "Space Intro/Fly Like an Eagle" were all part of the lineup. Miller knew if he left any of those out, he would have heard it from the crowd.

Speaking of the audience, it was small. But it made a lot of noise.

The guitar-man not only treated the audience to the hits, but he returned to his roots and cranked out some blues.

"Nobody But You" and "God Bless the Child" were among those offerings.

Miller's band - drummer Gordy Knudtson, guitarist Kenny Lee Lewis, bassist Billy Peterson, keyboardist Joseph Wooten and harmonica player Norton Buffalo - jammed away in a comfortable manner. There were no pretentious posings or unnecessary attitudes.

Instead, the band followed Miller's lead and gave the audience what it expected - some fun-time party tunes.

Staple radio-friendly rockers such as "Jungle Love," "Gangster of Love," "Space Cowboy" (dedicated to the Mir space station) and "Take the Money and Run" were more tidbits of nostalgia pop the band played.

The band also played a couple of country tunes - "Dance Dance Dance" and an excerpt of "(Ghost) Riders in the Sky." And getting into the psychedelia, this year without the sitar, Miller and the boys played "Wild Mountain Honey."

Then getting back to familiar ditties, Miller and his posse played "Rockin' Me" and the trademark "The Joker."

As usual, the familiar refrain of "Jet Airliner" served as the encore.

The first part of the show was a little slow at times, but as the night progressed, the 55-year-old Miller and his band let it all hang loose.