The line between rural areas and industrial areas can be hard to walk, Kaysville is finding out.

Contractors and other home-business owners at a Tuesday public hearing spoke against a pro-posed ordinance change that would keep large trucks from "living" in agricultural areas and limit accessory building space for new home-occupation licensees.Recommended by the Planning Commission to deal with an increase in houses on Kaysville's western agricultural areas, the change would take out the rural home occupation license and redefine what business owners who work out of their homes can do.

The changes include limiting trucks used in business to under 18,000 pounds gross vehicle weight as well as requiring owners of major home-occupation businesses to notify neighbors living within 300 feet of their property about a pending application for an occupation.

Also, accessory buildings used for home occupations are limited to cover no more than 5 percent of the total property area.

"Any type of commercial or industrial business that wants to, can buy enough land, build a home on it and refer to it laughingly as a home occupational business," said Laurence Huston, a resident who said he supports the ordinance change.

"The business should be incidental to the home, rather than the home being incidental to the business," he added.

But Fred Mitchell, a contractor who has lived in Kaysville for 45 years, disagreed. "It would force every contractor with a truck over 18,000 pounds to move," he said. Mitchell said he owns four trucks he uses for his business that exceed the limit.

After the hearing, the City Council approved only the portion of the ordinance change dealing with residential child care licensing, which now matches state regulations. They tabled the rest of the changes for further review.