In the 1930s, the world watched as Germany built the most advanced army that had ever come into existence. Breaking the treaty of Versailles was easy with no intervention on behalf of the nations who composed the treaty. What a grave error that was. Today in our society, we face a similar problem.

As we look at Washington, D.C., we face a dilemma that, although it would not have the same results as WWII, is also very detrimental to our nation's moral and productivity. The national debt has now surpassed a staggering $5 trillion. If we estimate the average responsibility to the American public, the total would be more than $80,000 for each family. That is an incredible amount of debt. So what do we do to solve the problem? Two things we might do to turn the tide and reverse this grave error?Perhaps the most fundamental thing one could talk about in solving this or any problem lies in educating the public. In a recent poll people were asked what we should cut to eliminate the national debt. Surprisingly more than 35 percent of the public responded that foreign aid, if cut, would lower the federal debt. Little do these people realize that less than 3 percent of the total national budget goes into foreign aid.

The second proposal I would make is the formation of a new party. Many of our problems with the budget stem from allegiance to a party. The new party would become an allegiance of statesmen and stateswomen who only desire the welfare of the people at large.

The national debt is certainly not something to be ignored. If it goes unattended, we may find ourselves like those who ignored the treaty of Versailles, in crisis.

John McKee

Salt Lake City