Mint Michael Jordan rookie cards, centered perfectly with straight edges and corners, are worth $1,000.

Karl Malone's rookie card is stagnant at a value of $70.And even if the Utah Jazz defeat the Chicago Bulls for the NBA title next week, it is not expected to matter much for Karl and company's mugshots.

"If they win the championship, I'll bet Malone's card doesn't go up in value more than $20," said Steve Daly, owner of Half-time Sports Cards in Spanish Fork.

That's still not bad for the people who paid a quarter for it, Daly said.

One local card dealer believes Malone paraphernalia should be quoted at a higher worth.

"I think most card dealers think the Karl Malone card is very underpriced," said Craig Snyder, owner of Edgemont Sports Cards in Provo. "I mean, he'll probably be the No.3 all-time NBA scorer, be uniformly considered the greatest power forward ever to play and he'll probably be among the top five or six rebounders in history."

So why the colossal difference between Jordan's card and the Mailman's?

"Jordan just has such a mystique about him," Snyder said. "He's not only won multiple MVP awards, he's won multiple championships. If the Bulls beat the Jazz again this year, it will just add to his mystique and it will diminish Karl's."

There are, however, some Malone products that rank in worth near Jordan's rookie card. The Starting Lineup Karl Malone action figure of a decade ago is worth $700, if in mint condition.

Starting Lineup began making basketball action figures in 1988 and produced about 2,000 of each figure. For some reason, Snyder said, they only made about 400 of each Jazz figure, which makes them worth more.

In order to collect the full $700 for the Malone doll, it has to be in the original packaging. It also helps if the corners of the box are straight and the package is unaltered in every way, Daly said. If the box was ripped open, the doll probably still is worth upwards of $350, he said.

A lot of times, value all depends on the negotiations with the customer, Daly said. "If they want cash for something, I'll always give them the low-end value. But if they are giving me something I need for something they want, I'll usually give them the high-end."

Right now in Utah, Greg Foster cards are a hot item because his cards are difficult to find. John Stockton cards from 1984 are in demand, along with Chrome Cards from all sports, said Ron Fox, employee of Collector's Choice Sports Cards in Pleasant Grove.

Unfortunately, Fox said, not a whole lot of Jazz items were in demand Monday after their 42-point Sunday loss.

"Today, people aren't in the market for anything Jazz," Fox said. "They're kind of on-again, off-again fans, if you know what I mean. If the Jazz win, they buy a lot and if they lose they don't buy anything."