Alabama has become the second state to charge Barnes & Noble with breaking child pornography laws, accusing the nation's largest bookseller of exploiting "innocence for financial gain."

Prosecutors say that by selling books with photographs of nude children - "Radiant Identities" by Jock Sturges and "The Age of Innocence" by French photographer David Hamilton - Barnes & Noble is breaking state law.Attorney General Bill Pryor said he investigated after complaints about the large, coffee-table style books of black-and-white photographs.

"We must protect children from those who would exploit their innocence for financial gain under the guise of so-called `art,"' he said.

The indictment was returned Feb. 6 but not made public until Wednesday. If Barnes & Noble is convicted, the New York-based company could be fined up to $320,000.