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Keith Johnson, Deseret Morning News
Howard Moore still has his old Rolleiflex.

Howard Moore was a Deseret News photographer for nearly 40 years before he retired in 1987.

He still reads the paper every day but didn't notice his name on Wednesday's front page, crediting him with pictures he took 47 years ago of the man revealed this week as "Deep Throat."

Moore, 79, just thought it was interesting to know who Deep Throat was after all these years. He did not remember meeting Mark Felt or taking his photo back in 1958 for a Deseret News story.

But media throughout the country were taking notice of Moore's pictures.

The photos had gone out over the Associated Press wires, and AP member newspapers and TV stations across the country started running Moore's pictures of Felt wearing a hat and firing a gun and looking exactly like what he was — a quick-on-the-draw FBI agent in the 1950s.

Even before they heard from Time and Newsweek and the History Channel, the Deseret Morning News editors knew their exclusive photos of Felt were great, says managing editor Rick Hall.

"And you know when you have a hot picture you should just let somebody else handle it. We don't have time to negotiate royalty rights." So the national editors and producers were referred to Getty Images, a photo agency in Seattle.

On Thursday afternoon, Chuck Wing, a Morning News photo editor, called Moore at his home in Salt Lake City and told him his photos had been picked up by CNN and the New York Times and the New York Post and dozens of other papers and that Time and Newsweek were interested, too. Moore went looking for his Wednesday paper but by then the recycling truck had already come by.

So a reporter dropped by his home with a copy of the paper. When he saw the photos, Moore just shook his head. He could not remember going out to a firing range and watching an FBI agent crouch, draw and shoot back in 1958.

But Nelson Wadsworth, who wrote the story on Felt that ran with Moore's pictures, remembered the story clearly.

Wadsworth worked for the Deseret News from 1956 to 1959, covering the federal government beat. When he picked up Wednesday's paper, he recognized Felt at once and remembered writing the story.

"I've got a clipping of it in my scrapbook," Wadsworth said. Pasted next to the clipping is the letter Wadsworth got from J. Edgar Hoover after the story ran.

Wadsworth, 74, had written about the fact that FBI agents could draw and fire in three seconds. Felt mailed the newspaper article to the FBI director in Washington, D.C. Then Hoover wrote to Wadsworth to thank him and tell him that his story would serve to deter criminals.

When Wadsworth saw the story and photos of Felt in Wednesday's paper, he quickly sent an e-mail to the Deseret Morning News editorial department saying it didn't surprise him a bit that Felt could not abide the "crooks in the Nixon administration."

"Mark was old-school FBI who believed strongly in truth and justice," Wadsworth said.

Moore still has the camera he used to take Felt's photos — it was the same one he used to take photos of President Dwight D. Eisenhower in Salt Lake City. He still owns that Rolleiflex, as a matter of fact.

These days, Moore uses a digital camera. He is having just as much fun with it as he had with the first camera he ever got back when he was 8 years old. Moore said he feels lucky to have been able to spend a lifetime with his two great loves — his wife, Afton, and his career in photography.


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