On May 21 and 22, your car can become a time machine. Just drive it to the 17th Annual Heritage Home Tour and you'll go back in time 40 to 90 years. You'll be invited to walk through nine historic houses - four in the lower Avenues, five in the Yalecrest area, and one in Emigration Canyon. And to add to the nostalgia of the period, vintage, restored automobiles will be parked at the entrances of these homes.

Last year, an estimated 4,000 visitors participated in the Utah Heritage Foundation Home Tour. And, with the cooperation of the elements, this year's tour promises to be a success.Tour chairwoman Cathleen Clark is excited about this upcoming event. "It is one of Salt Lake's finer annual traditions."

She said it brings the public in contact with homeowners who have worked many hours to restore their houses. It also acts as a reminder of the importance of preserving Utah's rich heritage.

Since the homes in this year's tour are not clustered in one area, you need to climb in your "time machine" to take you from place to place.

In the Avenues area are the Ralph Bradley home (1175 Second Avenue), the Harris Simmons home (170 P Street), the Mark Finlinson home (171 Virginia Street) and the Jane Wright home (1437 East South Temple).

The Bradley home was built about 1902 and purchased in 1911 by George A. Steiner, the founder of American Linen Supply Company. Although divided into a duplex after Steiner's death, the Franklin Johnsons bought it in 1972 and restored it to single family use. The present owners are Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Bradley.

The Queen Anne style Simmons' home was built in 1891. Impressive are the two-story corner tower and the renewed interior decorated in a simplified Victorian style.

The Finlinson home was built by J. Hill Johnson in the late 1920s. This Neo-Classical adaptation has a distinctive French flavor.

The Wright home was built around 1918. The eclectic design was influenced by the French Norman style. The owner is Jane Wright, an interior designer.

Five more historic homes spotlighted in this year's home tour are located in the Yalecrest area: the Madsen home at 1763 E. Ninth South; the Anderson home at 1881 Hubbard Avenue; the Taylor home at 1822 Michigan Avenue; the Sadleir home at 1871 Yalecrest Avenue; and the Rasmussen home at 1717 Yalecrest Avenue.

Built in 1935, the Madsen Cape Cod cottage shows a strong interest in the Colonial Revival just before World War II, and this design remains a popular house form today.

The Anderson home, built in 1938, is Spanish Colonial. It's present owner is Salt Lake interior designer Scott Anderson.

Built in 1937, the Taylor home is reminiscent of the rural English architecture that came to America in Colonial times. It has an asymmetrical facade and a steep Gothic pitched roof.

Mr. and Mrs. William Sadleir purchased their Colonial Georgian home in 1971. Behind this light and airy home is a swimming pool and deck area.

F. Orin Woodbury, founder of the Woodbury real estate firm, built the Rasmussen home in 1936. Its style is Colonial-Georgian. Doric fluted columns support a handsome portico. The owners, G. Lynn and Connee Rasmussen, continue to make impressive interior changes.

The last home on the tour is was built in 1914 as a summer home by Wilbur S. Henderson. Owners Phil and Donetta Davis have converted it into a bed and breakfast and renamed it the Pinecrest Inn. It is located three miles up Emigration Canyon.

All but one of the homes listed above will be open on May 21 and 22 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. for guided tours. The Pinecrest Inn will be open on Sunday only between 1 and 7 p.m.

Tickets for the Heritage Home Tour are $8 for UHF members, $9 for non-members prior to the tour, and $10 on tour days. Just drop by the Utah Heritage Foundation office (355 Quince Street) or Basil's, Uppercrust Bakery, Felt Buchorn, Gentler Times, Ec-lec-tic, Hazel's Hallmark Appletree, Just For Cooks, and Trolley Cards. Or buy your tickets at any of the Heritage Homes on tour days.

For additional information, call the UHF office, 533-0858.