Among the candidates who recently filed for seats in the Utah House of Representatives are school teachers, a businessman, a railroad foreman and a current member of the Legislature.

Lloyd Siegendorf, a math and science teacher at Salt Lake Community High School, is making his first bid for public office as a Democratic candidate in District 28.Siegendorf said he is committed to work for quality education for the state's children and opposes new taxes. He said the state must have an equitable tax structure, incentives for small businesses and an upgraded educational system to stimulate the state's economy.

"With limited resources, I will prioritize programs that focus on students rather than on wasteful bureaucracies," he said. "Finally, in a year when tough decisions must be made and priorities established, I am firmly committed to no new taxes."

Gene Rosvall, a teacher in the Granite School District, is a Republican candidate in District 35. He has served on the Murray City Council, as chairman of the board of the Murray City Municipal Building Authority, and as vice-chairman of the Murray Redevelopment Agency and the Murray Community Council.

Rosvall said he believes in self-sufficiency and that in many ways, the state has reached its limit on taxes and services. He said he would seek to limit the size of government.

"We must ensure that no new programs are added to government services without the taxpayers being willing, and more importantly, able to fund such," he said. "Together, we must mandate quality management of our tax dollars, spending only for services required."

Val Lund, who describes himself as an educational administrator, businessman, energy researcher and consultant, is a Democratic candidate in District 39.

Lund said he is concerned about the direction Utah is headed and said he wants to restore confidence and pride in the state. He said many of the state's laws need to be reviewed, and called for prioritizing expenditures.

"I am concerned that our citizens elect quality representation, and that we do more to stimulate a strong economy," he said. "The day that we can survive in a rapidly changing world economy with a `Good Old Boys Club' in the Legislature is over."

Paul Hiskey, a foreman in the mechanical department of the Union Pacific Railroad, is a Democratic candidate in District 47.

Hiskey said the state's educational system must be flexible enough to accommodate changes needed for future generations. He also said the state's tax structure must encourage development.

"With my candidacy, I bring a total commitment to revitalizing Utah's economy," he said. "We as a legislative body must become more creative and work harder with the business community in order to attract the much-needed development in Utah."

Daniel Tuttle, a Democrat, is seeking a third term representing District 52.

Tuttle said his accomplishments as a legislator include co-sponsoring the 1985 copper resolution to assist B.P. Minerals in competing with foreign companies; sponsoring the resolution that called for maintaining the air quality control of the open pit copper mine's tailing pond and chairing the legislative task force to re-establish the South Shore Beach.

He has also served on various legislative committees, including Judicial Conduct; Labor, Business and Economic Development; Health; Natural Resources; the Governor's Task Force for the Homeless and the Blue Ribbon Study Committee for Antelope Island.