To the editor:

It is of significant moment that Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann are making what may well be one of mankind's most life-transforming discoveries since the discovery of electricity. Many significant things have and will come from our modestly-populated state. We owe a deep debt of gratitude to Pons for having come to the University of Utah.Their potentially overwhelming contribution to the world came from their research. Hopefully, their efforts will persuade those voices that feel the university should do far more teaching and much less research.

Whether fusion ever brings substantial economic development to our state is speculative at this time, but as important, or more so, is whether this discovery could significantly affect the source of energy for all the world.

Whether some of us have been here for six generations, six years or six months, Utah is still a very special place and will continue so to be. Our economy is not strong, but our people are. We have known since 1847 that there was more gold in other hills than in ours, but our families decided to stay and "till the rocky soil."

I hope that Pons and his family realize what hope and anticipation he has breathed into the fabric of our community and state. the potential benefits will possibly not be fully realized in my lifetime but hopefully in the generation of my children and grandchildren.

The U. officials, the governor and the Legislature have all responded in a timely and appropriate way and we should be grateful and supportive.

John Preston Creer

Salt Lake City