Utahns believe, by a 2-1 margin, that the legal age for buying cigarettes should be raised to 21, according to a public opinion survey taken recently by students at LDS Business College.

In a hodgepodge of questions covering a variety of topics, those surveyed also said they would support a 5-cent deposit on beverage cans and bottles in order to reduce litter but would not support a state-sponsored lottery nor a federal gasoline tax to reduce the federal deficit.

The telephone poll of 1,094 adults, compiled by marketing and research students, found that 62 percent favor raising the legal age for buying cigarettes while 30.5 percent oppose such a move. Seven percent were undecided. More men surveyed - 34 percent - oppose such a change, while only 27.5 percent of women surveyed would oppose the age hike.

Almost the same percentage of those surveyed, 61.5 percent, favor a nickel deposit on beverage bottles and cans to reduce litter, while 32.5 percent oppose such a deposit and 6 percent said they did not know.

A 10-cents-per-gallon federal gasoline tax that would be used to reduce the federal deficit would be supported by 41 percent of Utahns, but 46 percent said they would oppose such a tax. Thirteen percent were undecided.

Utahns surveyed also said they would not support a state-sponsored lottery, but like other polls conducted in the past, the margin is small. Forty-two percent favor the lottery while 48.5 percent oppose it and 9.5 percent are undecided.

Oliver North, who is on trial in Washington, D.C., for his role in the Iran/Contra scandal, should be pardoned, according to those surveyed. More than 41.5 percent indicated they feel he should be pardoned, while nearly 35 percent said he should not. A large percentage - almost 24 percent - were undecided.

More than 45.5 percent of the men surveyed said North should be pardoned, but only 38 percent of the women felt the same way. However, 29.5 percent of the women were unsure about North, while only a little more than 17 percent of the men said they were undecided.

Those surveyed were also asked how closely they followed the action in the Utah Legislature this year. Only 10 percent said they followed the session very closely. Almost 53.5 percent said they followed the legislators somewhat closely and almost 37 percent said they did not follow the session at all.

Breaking down the statistics into men and women, 33 percent of the men said they did not follow the Legislature, while nearly 40 percent of the women surveyed said they didn't pay attention to the recent session.

The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percent.