For once, Gov. Norm Bangerter got off work in time for dinner on the final day of bill signing.

"Some of you said it (the legislative session) was boring," Ban-gerter told reporters Tuesday afternoon. "I'm always more comfortable when it's boring."By 5 p.m., Bangerter finished the time-consuming job of deciding whether each bill should be signed, vetoed or allowed to become law without his signature, well before the midnight deadline.

He announced Tuesday he had vetoed two more bills, making a total of four vetoes out of 344 bills and resolutions lawmakers passed during the 45-day session that ended Feb. 22.

Although he didn't get the tax cut or the freeze on local property taxes he wanted, Bangerter had praise for lawmakers. "On balance, I think the Legislature did a good job."

In vetoing a bill that would have prohibited gambling in restaurants and clubs, Bangerter said the bill would have stripped owners of their licenses if they were even accused of allowing gambling.

"I believe they (owners) should have due process," Bangerter said, adding that licenses should be revoked only if owners are convicted.

Bangerter said he vetoed a bill that would have allowed more leeway for people to burn garbage openly because it would have been a step backward in efforts to provide clean air along the Wasatch Front. The bill was sponsored by Rep. Jeril Wilson, R-Provo.

Bangerter has formed a committee to study the state's pollution problems. "It is premature to eliminate a piece of the possible solution," he said.

During the session, Bangerter vetoed two bills dealing with the executive branch's ability to write administrative rules, which have the same effect as law. But he eventually reached a compromise with his GOP colleagues in the House and Senate over those measures.

The governor said Tuesday he is allowing eight bills to become law without his signature - the typical way of showing mild displeasure.

Bangerter said he declined to sign SB69 - the cable TV measure - into law because it may be unconstitutional and harm innocent people.

As for SB53, which sets up an Indian affairs task force, Bangerter said the state already has a state board of Indian Affairs.

The governor said he didn't sign the bill removing mobile homes from vehicle title and registration requirements - SB210 - because it has caused confusion in the mobile home industry.

Bangerter wouldn't sign the lake study bill, HB208, because the bill did not give him the the authority to approve what the committee does.

Bangerter also declined to give his signature to the bill allowing state employer pension contributions to go to a deferred compensation plan administered by an outside party - SB49 - because he wants the money administered by the State Retirement Board.

As for HB261, the bill creating a privatization policy board, Bangerter said privatization of government services is an unproven concept.

Bangerter believes the administrative rules bill - HB408 - is unnecessary, although he believes it's far better than the two previous tries he vetoed.

And as for the technical change in the Real Estate Recovery Fund Act, HB328, Bangerter said the law may make it difficult for the state to recover damages from corporations that default on real estate.

Measures vetoed Tuesday:

- A measure that would have prohibited gambling in restaurants and clubs. The bill would have stripped owners of their licenses if they were even accused of allowing gambling.

- A bill that would have allowed more leeway for people to burn garbage openly.

Measures becoming law

without signature:

- SB69, which makes it illegal to tap into cable television without paying for the service.

- SB53, which sets up an Indian affairs task force.

- SB210, which removes mobile homes from the title and registration requirements imposed on motor vehicles.

- HB208, which sets up the Great Salt Lake Development Authority to study whether to dike the lake and turn the eastern section into a fresh-water lake.

- SB49, a technical bill that allows 1.5 percent of state employer pension contributions to go to a deferred compensation plan administered by an outside party.

- HB261, which sets up a privatization policy board.

- HB408, the compromise Gov. Bangerter and lawmakers reached over whether lawmakers should review every administrative rule written by a government agency.

- HB328, a technical change in the Real Estate Recovery Fund Act.