Here's some trivia about Friday's inauguration of George Herbert Walker Bush and James Danforth Quayle:

- This is the 51st inauguration - and it marks the bicentennial of swearing in presidents. George Washington was sworn in on April 30, 1789.- George Bush is the second president to be named George, Washington being the other.

- Quayle will be the third-youngest vice president ever at inauguration at age 41 years 350 days. The two who were younger were John C. Breckinridge (under Buchanan) at age 36 years 42 days, and Richard M. Nixon (under Eisenhower) at age 40 years 11 days.

- For those wondering how young vice presidents' careers proceeded, Breckinridge ran for the presidency and lost against Lincoln. He then joined the Confederacy and became a general. After the Civil War he was elected as senator from Kentucky, but was expelled by the Senate for his earlier rebellion. Nixon went on to became the only U.S. president to resign. The fourth-youngest vice president ever at inauguration - Theodore Roosevelt at age 42 years 128 days - also became the youngest president ever when 124 days into his term, William McKinley was assassinated.

- Bush will be only the second president inaugurated on the West Front of the Capitol. Reagan was the first, in 1980. Thirty-six of the 51 inaugurations have taken place at the East Front. Five others were held in the House chamber, three in the Senate chamber, two at Congress Hall in Philadelphia (Washington and Adams), one at Federal Hall in New York City (Washington), one at the Capitol's South Portico (FDR, 1944) and one (Reagan in 1984) in the rotunda.

- Outgoing President Ronald Reagan will attend Bush's swearing-in, a tradition observed by all but four presidents living when their successors took office. John Adams and John Quincy Adams refused to attend inaugurations of their successors after bitter campaigns, Andrew Johnson boycotted the inauguration of U.S. Grant when Grant would not ride with him in a carriage to the ceremony, and Richard Nixon quickly left town after his resignation and missed the swearing-in of Gerald Ford.

- Bush, 63, will be older than the average president at inauguration. The average age has been 55 years 209 days. The oldest age of a president at his first inauguration was Reagan at 69; the youngest at inauguration was John F. Kennedy at age 43 (although Theodore Roosevelt rose to the presidency at a younger age because of the death of a president).

- The longest inaugural address ever given was by William Henry Harrison, 8,445 words. He delivered it in freezing winds without an overcoat or hat. He subsequently caught pneumonia and died a month later. The shortest speech was a 135-word, two-paragraph speech by George Washington at his second inauguration.

- Outgoing President Reagan will tie for the second-longest presidency in history - exactly 8 years, a record also held by presidents Madison, Monroe, Jackson, Grant, Cleveland (in two, non-consecutive terms), Wilson and Eisenhower. Washington fell short of that mark slightly with a term of 7 years, 308 days because of changes in the dates of inaugurations. The longest term was 12 years and 39 days, held by Franklin D. Roosevelt.

- Weather has traditionally been fairly good for inaugurations. Thirty-two have been held in clear weather, 10 in rain and eight in snow. The sub-zero weather and high winds four years ago forced cancellation of the inaugural parade, and moved the swearing-in ceremony indoors.

- The chief justice of the Supreme Court is not required to administer the oath of office, but he has sworn in all but eight presidents. Many of those eight were vice presidents taking the oath quickly after the death of a president. Those sworn in by people other than the chief justice are: Washington (two times), Tyler, Fillmore, Arthur, Theodore Roosevelt, Coolidge and Lyndon B. Johnson.