Here is a breakdown of the conventional forces stationed in Europe as provided in a report by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

The information, as of January 1988, gives different equipment categories and manpower of ground forces of NATO and the Warsaw Pact countries stationed in Europe from the Atlantic Ocean to the Ural Mountains in the Soviet Union.Main battle tanks:

Bulgaria, 1,800; Czechoslovakia, 3,800; German Democratic Republic, 3,000; Hungary, 1,300; Poland, 3,400; Romania, 1,200; USSR, 37,000. Total: Warsaw Pact, 51,500; NATO, 16,424.

Artillery:

Bulgaria, 2,000; Czechoslovakia, 2,100; German Democratic Republic, 1,700; Hungary, 800; Poland, 2,500; Romania, 1,300; USSR, 33,000. Total: Warsaw Pact, 43,400; NATO, 14,458.

Anti-tank weapons:

Bulgaria, 500; Czechoslovakia, 2,000; German Democratic Republic, 1,700; Hungary, 800; Poland, 2,000; Romania, 700; USSR, 36,500. Total: Warsaw Pact, 44,200; NATO, 18,240.

Personnel (ground forces):

Bulgaria, 135,000; Czechoslovakia, 145,000; German Democratic Republic, 120,000; Hungary, 80,000; Poland, 230,000; Romania, 180,000; USSR, 2,200,000. Totals: Warsaw Pact, 3,090,000; NATO, 2,213,593.

Combat aircraft:

Bulgaria, 250; Czechoslovakia, 400; German Democratic Republic, 350; Hungary, 150; Poland, 700; Romania, 350; USSR, 6,050. Totals: Warsaw Pact, 8,250; NATO, 3,977.