** Welfare parents with children over 3 would have to participate in a new Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) program offering education, training andwork activities ranging from high school to community jobs.

** States would have to concentrate available resources on the toughest cases-young parents working without a high school education, longterm recipients and families with older children who are expected to lose eligibility.** JOBS participants would receive transportation and child care help. Welfare parents working their way off the rolls would qualify for a year of transitional child care and Medicaid benefits. States could charge for the transitional services on a sliding scale.

** For the first time the federal government would require all states to pay cash benefits to two-parent welfare families. Only 27 do so now.

** Starting in 1994, one adult in each two-parent welfare household would have to participate in a job search and, if it failed, 16 hours a week in a state-organized work activity. A young parent could work instead toward a high school diploma.

** States would have to step up child support collections from non-custodial parents, including automatic wage withholding upon the court award of support payments. States would get federal money to set up a computerized tracking and monitoring system for child support enforcement.

** The $3.3 billion expense of the bill would be covered through a variety oftax moves, among them eliminating the dependent care credit now available for children aged 13 to 15 and extending for five years the Internal Revenue Service'sdebt collection program.