Clyde L. Miller, Utah's first lieutenant governor, died Sept. 14, 1988, in a Salt Lake care center of natural causes. He was 78.

Mr. Miller, a Democrat, held the state's second highest office from 1964-76. For the first 11 years his title was secretary of state, but the position was changed in 1975 to lieutenant governor.Mr. Miller, who was known as "Clyde" to most Capitol employees, became enamored with politics after participating in his first campaign in 1928. Although not old enough to vote, he distributed material for Al Smith, the original "Happy Warrior," in his unsuccessful bid against President Herbert Hoover.

After the campaign, a group asked Mr. Miller to become a district chairman, and despite his age, he took the post. He was hooked from that time on, holding several offices in the Young Democrats, including state president, director and chairman of the board of a seven-state region.

He also served in the city health department and the county assessor's office before entering state government.

In 1941, he became executive secretary of the state Road Commission, a position he held until 1948. He also was executive secretary of the state Building Board and Aeronautics Commission.

In 1964, a relatively unknown Clyde Miller and another relatively obscure man named Calvin L. Rampton ran for secretary of state and governor, respectively, both on the Democratic ticket. Both were elected and served for three terms together. Mr. Miller did not seek re-election in 1976.

When elected secretary of state, Mr. Miller was a state senator. Representing Salt Lake City's 4th Senate District, he sponsored bills dealing with highways, education and state government organization. He was Senate Democratic whip in 1961. He also served in the Utah House of Representatives from 1951-52.

As lieutenant governor, Mr. Miller is remembered most for rewriting state election laws to improve voter registration and absentee voting.

Mr. Miller was part-owner and operator of Miller Brothers Laundry and Dry Cleaning Inc., a business he started with his brother, Rudy. It survived for nearly 20 years until 1968.

A graduate of the University of Utah, Mr. Miller was active in education, serving on the U. Board of Regents. He was also a member of the boards of directors of Weber State College, Utah State University and Southern Utah State College.

Mr. Miller was also a member of the Salt Lake Area Chamber of Commerce, the Jackson Democratic League and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was a former president, secretary and treasurer of the National Association of Secretaries of State.

Funeral will be Saturday noon at 36 E. Seventh South. Friends may call at that address Friday 7-9 p.m., and an hour before the ceremony. Burial will be in Wasatch Lawn Memorial Park. (See obituary on page B2.)