President Bush is presenting a rosy view of his administration's environmental accomplishments, despite criticism from environmental activists that he has failed to live up to his rhetoric.

Bush said in a report to Congress on Thursday that his environmental quality achievements saw "a landmark year" in 1990, and that in the coming year he will pursue "market-oriented" provisions in amendments to the Clean Water Act and other legislation.But environmental organizations such as the League of Conservation Voters and the Wilderness Society put out bleak report cards on Bush this year.

The league charged Bush's environmental policy "is moving away from the promises of the '88 campaign and the progress of the first year toward the neglect and indifference" that it said characterized President Reagan's tenure.

He did not give specifics, but said he would "seek to make progress toward the goal of no-net-loss of wetlands."

Bush said in the coming year he will pursue:

- Public partnerships with private industry to work on pollution prevention, conservation, education and international environmental cooperation.

- Stimulation of volunteer activities through presidential awards for "achievement in conservation and environmental affairs."

- His previously stated goal to establish a Department of the Environment in the president's Cabinet, a proposal that languished in Congress last year.

The report's tenor and content were intended in part to rebut criticism from environmental groups who have claimed that midway through Bush's first term he has failed to come through.

But environmental organizations such as the League of Conservation Voters and the Wilderness Society put out bleak report cards on Bush this year.

The league charged Bush's environmental policy "is moving away from the promises of the '88 campaign."