The choice of Dan Quayle as Vice President George Bush's running mate made little impact on Utahns' presidential preferences, a just-completed Deseret News/KSL-TV poll shows.

Likewise, Utahns don't hold strong opinions about Quayle's military service during the Vietnam War, pollster Dan Jones & Associates found.Quayle visited Utah last Friday. He received a warm reception during a Farmington rally sponsored by local Republicans. Jones was polling on Quayle on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, so the good reception was known to some of those questioned by Jones.

A 22-year-old Quayle joined the Indiana National Guard in 1969, deciding not to join an active military unit that would see action in Vietnam. His influential family made some calls on his behalf to Guard leaders, aimed at getting him in the Guard quickly. But there were openings in the Guard at that time, so the calls weren't necessary.

Utahns aren't concerned about Quayle's military career. Asked "Do you have a less favorable opinion of Dan Quayle because he chose to serve in the National Guard during the Vietnam War?" 16 percent said they have a less favorable opinion, 77 percent said it made no difference to them and 8 percent didn't know.

Asked if Quayle should remain on the Republican presidential ticket, 70 percent said yes, 12 percent said no and 18 percent didn't know.

Jones also asked if Quayle as a vice presidential running mate made respondents more likely to vote for Bush, less likely to vote for him, made no difference (would vote for Bush anyway) or if respondents wouldn't vote for Bush regardless of who he chose as his running mate?

Twelve percent said Quayle on the ticket made them more inclined to vote for Bush; 53 percent said it made no difference - they'd vote for Bush in any case; 8 percent said Quayle made them less likely to vote for Bush; and 20 percent said they wouldn't vote for Bush no matter what.

Jones asked that same question about Sen. Lloyd Bentsen of Texas, the vice presidential pick of Democratic presidential nominee Michael Dukakis.

Thirteen percent said Bentsen's presence on the ticket made them more likely to vote for Dukakis; 36 percent said it made no difference - they'd vote for Dukakis anyway; 5 percent said Bentsen made them less likely to vote for Dukakis; and 39 percent said they wouldn't vote for Dukakis in any case.

Traditionally, vice presidential candidates don't make a big impact on who a person picks to vote for for president. Jones' survey found that to be just the case in Utah.

Do you have a less favorable opinion of Dan Quayle because he chose to serve in the National Guard during the Vietnam War?

Less favorable 16 percent

No 77 percent

Don't know 8 percent

Do you favor or oppose Dan Quayle remaining on the Republican presidential ticket?

Favor 70 percent

Oppose 12 percent

Don't know 18 percent