Someone has figured out how much more (or less) Congress decided you will pay next year to slow the growth of the federal deficit - and it's a lot, unless you are already poor.

If you are poor, you will actually pay less because of new tax-system changes. But if you are middle-class, you will likely pay hundreds of dollars more. And if you are among the most wealthy, you will pay thousands of dollars more.That's according to G. William Hoagland, Republican staff director of the Senate Budget Committee.

He used Census and consumer data to figure out how changes that Congress just enacted to slow the growth of the deficit will affect different income groups.

Those changes include increasing the national gasoline tax by 5 cents a gallon; increasing the income tax rate for the wealthiest Americans; phasing out some income tax exemptions; increasing the maximum income subject to Medicare tax; and raising a series of taxes on alcohol, tobacco and luxury items.

Hoagland discovered that Congress did what it said it would, and shifted the tax burden toward the wealthy.

In fact, people whose income is more than $200,000 a year will pay an average of $8,443 more in taxes and fees. Meanwhile, the poorest Americans, earning less than $10,000 a year, will pay $3 less in tax.

To figure out how hard the tax changes will hit you, consider the following information from Hoagland:

- For those earning less than $10,000 a year: The average after-tax income for people in this category after the changes will be $5,665. They will pay $3 LESS in tax. Their effective tax rate stays roughly the same at 9.5 percent, meaning 9.5 percent of their income will go to taxes of various sorts.

- $10,000-$19,999: The average after-tax income for people in this category will be $13,555. They will pay an average of $36 LESS in tax each year. Their effective tax rate drops from 15.5 percent before the changes to 15.0 percent.

- $20,000-$29,999: The average after-tax income in this category for people will be $21,561. They will pay an average of $149 MORE in tax. Their effective tax rate increases from 20.5 percent to 20.9 percent.

- $30,000-$39,999: The average after-tax income for people in this category with the new changes will be $29,505. They will pay an average of $221 MORE in tax. Their effective tax rate increases from 22.7 to 23.2 percent.

- $40,000-$49,999: The average after-tax income for people in this category will be $37,161. They will pay an average of $278 MORE in tax. Their effective tax rate increases from 24.2 to 24.7 percent.

- $50,000-$74,999: The average after-tax income for people in this category will be $49,620. They will pay an average of $372 MORE in tax. Their effective tax rate jumps from 26.1 to 26.6 percent.

- $75,000-$99,999: The average after-tax income for people in this category will be $68,723. They will pay an average of $572 MORE in tax. Their effective tax rate increases from 27.3 to 27.9 percent.

- $100,000-$199,999: The average after-tax income for people in this category will be $101,888. They will pay an average of $901 MORE in tax. Their effective tax rate increases from 27.5 to 28.1 percent.

- $200,000 or more: The average after-tax income for people in this category will be $385,103. They will pay an average of $8,443 MORE in tax. Their effective tax rate increases from 28.9 to 30.5 percent.

The money from higher taxes will bring the government an extra $20.9 billion next year. The interest on it will bring another $1.6 billion. And coupled with $20.2 billion from cuts in spending, the package provides $42.7 billion to slow the deficit.

But Congress still hasn't figured a way to actually cut the deficit. Hoagland notes that even with the extra money, official estimates say the deficit will still increase from $220.4 billion this year to $295 billion next year and $308.7 billion in 1992.

The deficit would simply have grown even larger without the new tax increases.