Three Utah teachers have been honored as outstanding in their particular subject areas.

Patricia Ryland, Kearns High School, was named the Utah Dance Educator of the Year in a contest sponsored by the National Dance Association and co-sponsored in Utah by the Utah Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance.She has taught in the public schools for 10 years and, according to nominators, "raised dance at Kearns to an all-time high." The program has built over the years until it now has a very effective dance company and requires a second teacher. Attendance at dance concerts grew to the extent that they now must be held on three nights to accommodate audiences of up to 700.

Three years ago, Ryland organized Dance Awareness in the Elementary Schools under a career ladder project. She and the Kearns Dance Company go to 10 elementary schools every spring to conduct lectures and demonstrations for younger children.

She also helped organize a citywide teacher workshop and has involved her Kearns students in several tours to observe professional dancers and theatrics in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Scott Nielson, graphic arts teacher at Clearfield High School, has been honored as the 1990 National Trade and Industrial Education Outstanding Teacher of the Year. Nielson has been teaching for 12 years and has been the yearbook adviser at Clearfield as well as teaching graphic arts and desktop publishing. He is the Community School director and has taught many computer inservice classes for teachers.

He is Utah director for the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America and just helped his students plan and implement a program for helping the needy for Thanksgiving. His students have won many awards in competitions.

Nielson also is president of the Utah Vocational Association and has held other positions in professional groups. Recently, he was invited to serve on the new State Committee of Practitioners for implementing the Carl Parkins II Act, a federal program.

Elaine Moesser Burrows, career counselor at Kearns High School, also will be honored by the vocational association, being named Outstanding Vocational Educator for the Western Region.

She will be honored with other regional winners during meetings in Cincinnati.

Burrows' program, Building Bridges to the World of Work, places students in internships with area employers. They can explore a variety of occupations and receive important practical experience. Many companies initiate internship offers based on positive experience with the program.

Burrows contacts all of those students who have dropped out of the high school for any reason and alerts them to the program and to other educational options. She also piloted a dropout prevention program that will expand into other Granite District schools next year. The project provides at-risk students with a variety of occupational exposures and helps them prepare for finding and keeping jobs.