Blurred images of first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, her arms reaching out in anguish from the car carrying here mortally wounded husband, were part of TV's most memorable broadcast, a survey found.

President John F. Kennedy's 1963 assassination in Dallas topped astronaut Neil Armstrong's 1969 moon walk as the single most important television program in history, according to the survey, "The Best of the First 50 Years of Television."The acclaimed television miniseries "Roots" rated third, according to the survey released by the Siena Research Institute of Siena College, a small liberal-arts school.

Hundreds of college professors, TV and newspaper critics and others were asked to pick television's finest efforts from a wide range of categories.

The purpose was to prompt discussion and criticism, said Professor Thomas Kelly II.

"Roots," which looked at the history of slavery in America by tracing the ancestors of one black man, was chosen the best miniseries ever made.

"It was a highly dramatic historical presentation that people found attractive and revolting at the same time," Kelly said.

The survey named former RCA president and broadcast pioneer David Sarnoff the most significant figure in television history. The development of color broadcasts was chosen the most important technical innovation.

"Hill Street Blues," created by Stephen Bochco, was voted the best drama series by a 2-1 margin over second-place finisher "Playhouse 90."

Finishing sixth in the category was another Bochco creation, "L.A. Law."

The survey also distinguished Bochco as the second-most signigficant producer in television history, behind "All in the Family" creator Norman Lear.

"I Love Lucy" was ranked the No. 1 comedy series of all time, narrowly defeating "M.A.S.H."

"Gunsmoke" was the overwhelming winner of the best Western series category, followed by "Bonanza."

"The Ed Sullivan Show" topped the list of best variety series, ranked above "Carol Burnett" and "Your Show of Shows."

Jay Sandrich, whose credits include "Get Smart," "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," "Soap" and "The Cosby Show," was chosen most significant director, edging out Alfred Hitchcock and Rod Serling.

In the news-documentary category, "60 Minutes" was ranked first, followed by the 1950s show "See it Now."

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Survey results:

SINGLE MOST MEMORABLE TV PROGRAM

1. Assassination of JFK.

2. Moon walk.

3. "Roots."

4. Challenger disaster.

5. "See it Now."

6. "The Day After."

7. Final episode of "M.A.S.H."

8. "The Prisoner."

9. "Harvest of Shame."

BEST MINISERIES

1. "Roots."

2. "Lonesome Dove."

3. "Shogun."

4. "Rich Man, Poor Man."

5. "Winds of War."

BEST DRAMA SERIES

1. "Hill Street Blues."

2. "Playhouse 90."

3. "Hallmark Hall of Fame."

4. "The Twilight Zone."

5. "St. Elsewhere."

6. "L.A. Law."

7. "Star Trek."

8. "Upstairs, Downstairs."

9. "The Defenders."

BEST COMEDY SERIES

1. "I Love Lucy."

2. "M.A.S.H."

3. "All in the Family."

4. "Mary Tyler Moore."

5. "The Honeymooners."

6. "The Dick Van Dyke Show."

7. "Cheers."

8. "The Cosby Show."

9. "Kovacs."

10. "Murphy Brown."

BEST WESTERN SERIES

1. "Gunsmoke."

2. "Bonanza."

3. "Maverick."

4. "Have Gune, Will Travel."

5. "Wild, Wild West."

BEST VARIETY SERIES

1. "The Ed Sullivan Show."

2. "Carol Burnett."

3. "Your Show of Shows."

4. "The Smothers Brothers."

5. "Jackie Gleason."

BEST NEWS SHOW OR DOCUMENTARY

1. "60 Minutes."

2. "See it Now."

3. CBS News.

4. "Harvest of Shame."

5. ABC "Nightline."

BEST LATE-NIGHT SHOW

1. "The Tonight Show."

2. "Late Night with David Letterman."

3. "Saturday Night Live."

4. ABC "Nightline."

5. "Steve Allen."

BEST EARLY-MORNING SHOW

1. NBC "Today."

2. ABC "Good Morning America."

3. "Today" with Dave Garroway.

4. "Captain Kangaroo."

5. CBS "Sunday Morning" with Charles Kuralt.

BEST CHILDREN'S PROGRAM

1. "Sesame Street."

2. Captain Kangaroo."

3. "Mister Rogers Neighborhood."

4. "The Howdy Doody Show."

5. "Kukla, Fran and Ollie."

MOST MEMORABLE ON-CAMERA FIGURE

1. Rod Serling.

2. Larry Hagman.

3. Raymond Burr.

4. Richard Chamberlain.

5. David Janssen.

6. Jack Webb.

7. James Garner.

8. Daniel J. Travanti.

9. Alfred Hitchcock, Robert Young.

10. Peter Falk.

MOST MEMORABLE COMEDY FIGURE

1. Lucille Ball.

2. Carroll O'Connor.

3. Milton Berle.

4. Jackie Gleason.

5. Bill Cosby.

6. Mary Tyler Moore.

7. Alan Alda.

8. Sid Caesar.

9. Ernie Kovacs.

10. Jack Benny.

MOST MEMORABLE WESTERN FIGURE

1. James Arness.

2. Lorne Greene.

3. James Garner.

4. Chuck Connors.

5. Michael Landon.

MOST MEMORABLE VARIETY-MUSIC FIGURE

1. Ed Sullivan.

2. Carol Burnett.

3. Dick Clark.

4. Milton Berle.

5. Sid Caesar.

MOST MEMORABLE NEWS FIGURE

1. Walter Cronkite.

2. Edward R. Murrow.

3. David Brinkley.

4. Mike Wallace.

5. Team of Huntley-Brinkley.

MOST SIGNIFICANT BUSINESS FIGURE

1. Bill Paley.

2. David Sarnoff.

3. Ted Turner.

4. Pat Weaver.

5. Fred Silverman.

MOST SIGNIFICANT PRODUCER

1. Norman Lear.

2. Steve Bochco.

3. Fred Friendly.

4. Roone Arledge.

5. Aaron Spelling.

MOST SIGNIFICANT DIRECTOR

1. Jay Sandrich.

2. Alfred Hitchcock.

3. Rod Serling.

4. John Frankenheimer.

MOST SIGNIFICANT TECHNICAL INNOVATION

1. Color.

2. Satellites.

3. Videotape.

4. VCRs.

5. Cable.

MOST SIGNIFICANT FIGURE OVERALL

1. David Sarnoff (former president of RCA).

2. Bill Paley (founder of CBS).

3. Edward R. Murrow (CBS correspondent famed for his World War II broadcasts form Europe).

4. Walter Cronkite (former CBS anchorman).

5. Philo Farnsworth (developer of the cathode ray tube who demonstrated a working model of a television system in 1927).