What does "10W-30" mean in motor oil jargon?

Why is it so many modern cars don't need lube jobs?How do you tell if your air filter really needs replacing?

Those were just a few of the questions that executives from Evans Advertising fielded last week as they doffed their white shirts and ties in favor of coveralls and went into the pit - the grease pit that is - at one of Quaker State Minit-Lube's Salt Lake fast lube locations.

There were no art boards and computer terminals down there, just dip sticks and oil rags as the ad folks found out first hand - including greasy fingernails - all about the business it's their job to publicize. A "view from the pits" as one wag put it.

"We run all our office and management personnel through the program," said company president Jeff O'Neill, "so I thought our advertising agency people should do the same thing. Now they know what it's like underneath a car in 100-degree heat and what it's like to be on the trigger end of an oil gun. It's the best means of appreciating the efforts of our service crews."

Charles R. Bartholomew, president of Evans' Salt Lake office, and his associates, were impressed with Minit-Lube's systematic approach to servicing a car in the advertised 10 minutes.

Others from Evans undergoing the four-hour orientation were Robert Toussaint, account supervisor; Stefenee Huch, account executive/national; Marsha Fetzer, account executive/regional; Ron Stone, creative director; Scott Featherstone, assistant creative director; Jim Aalen, media director; Laurel Allen, account coordinator; Mike Korologos, public relations director; Laurie Engel, public relations account executive.

Incidentally, according to the Minit-Lube experts, "10W-30" means the oil assumes a lighter 10 weight in winter and the heavier 30 weight in summer. And you can tell if your car's air filter is still doing its job if you can see light through it. Also, many cars can't be lubed because the system is permanently contained.