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Christian groups express ‘grave concerns’ about Trump agenda, appointments

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  • CMTM Lake Forest, CA
    Jan. 11, 2017 9:30 a.m.

    RE: Karen R. said, "In my opinion the basis for your assertion was: None. I think you were just hoping to provoke a debate." True,

    My point is that, It has been my experience that liberals try to use Acts 4:32-35 to teach communism.

    But not all believers in Jerusalem sold all their possessions and put them in a hat which was then controlled by the state.

    And the individuals property rights were maintained through the rest of the Bible;

    It is wrong to teach a doctrine out of Context of Scripture . Utopia is not taught in Acts 2-5.
    E.g….,“ we gave you this rule: The one who is unwilling to work shall not eat." (2 Thess 3:10) Or,

    The Church members that were poor should not be supported by their brothers unless they were willing to work in any way possible to support themselves

  • FJSL Houston, TX
    Jan. 10, 2017 8:02 p.m.

    @ sashabill

    Karen R. here.

    Acts 4: 32-35: You used the word "commend" and IMO this passage does present redistribution as commendable. Later I noticed that "command" is used in the previous sentence and it occurred to me that "commend" was likely just a typo.

    "Nobody can exclusively put the label of 'Christian' on their perspective alone, and dismiss everyone else..."

    And yet dismissing is what your comment led with. I do agree, though, that exclusivity claims aren't merited.

    "...liberals complain about 'separation of church and state'..."

    I think this is true for some, but I believe my view - that all perspectives are equally entitled to be heard - is in the majority. Now, when believers want to impose their beliefs on others and without evidence to back them up? Yeah, then I have a problem with it. Curiously, such attempts almost always come from conservative perspectives.

    BTW, is it only "political advocacy" when liberal religious perspectives are brought into the public square or does this count for conservative religious views too?

  • sashabill Morgan Hill, CA
    Jan. 10, 2017 5:03 p.m.

    Karen R,
    Acts 4: 32-35 mentions nothing about a collectivist ideology of redistribution, established and maintained by state or bureaucratic force. That passage does illustrate my earlier comment - that Christians are indeed called upon to minister and look after the needs of the poor and underprivileged. How this may actually work out in the political realm is open to discussion, input, and debate. Nobody can exclusively put the label of "Christian" on their perspective alone, and dismiss everyone else as being somehow less-than-moral or less-than-Christian.

    It is amusing how liberals complain about "separation of church and state" when conservative religious perspectives are brought into the public square. Curiously, they have no such problem when religion is mixed with liberal politics.

  • Karen R. Houston, TX
    Jan. 10, 2017 2:19 p.m.

    @ sharrona

    In my opinion the basis for your assertion was: None. I think you were just hoping to provoke a debate - any debate, apparently, as you've now changed topic twice. But I responded to you only because you once again failed to properly credit another's work. Next time I won't even bother to call you out on that.

  • CMTM Lake Forest, CA
    Jan. 10, 2017 1:17 p.m.

    @ And your basis for this conclusion is...? (In your own words, please). OK, You have addressed me and not the response to your scripture use.. E.g…,

    Karen R.Quotes (Acts 4: 32-35) Context,verse 2:48 “And the Lord added to their number day by day those who were being saved.”

    As more people were saved things changed it became more difficult to support a large group. What works for little group becomes ineffective for a large group.

    The Pilgrims tried Communism, it didn’t work. You always have those who are slackers.

    “ we gave you this rule: The one who is unwilling to work shall not eat." 2 Thess 3:10

  • Karen R. Houston, TX
    Jan. 10, 2017 12:27 p.m.

    @ sharrona

    "but Apparently you agree with them."

    And your basis for this conclusion is...? (In your own words, please.)

  • CMTM Lake Forest, CA
    Jan. 10, 2017 11:42 a.m.

    Karen R. - Houston RE: Acts 4:32-5:16 - harlemgrace. Sorry, but Apparently you agree with them.

    Different topic. “USA Today, WASHINGTON” — A group of black pastors Monday criticized African-American opponents of attorney general nominee Sen. Jeff Sessions for demonizing the Alabama Republican, instead characterizing him as someone who shows “respect and care for people of all races.” The ministers are holdout Sessions supporters in a much larger crowd of opponents among Southern black clergy and African-American and civil rights groups, including the North Carolina Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Alabama NAACP and the activist group PICO, which uses congregations and churches to help in community organizing.

    “There is an attempt by some to demonize people and call them racist when there is actually no proof for it,” Evangelical Bishop Harry Jackson said at a Capitol Hill news conference. “Let me say clearly, Sen. Sessions is not a racist.”

  • Karen R. Houston, TX
    Jan. 10, 2017 10:24 a.m.

    "The early church expected Jesus to return soon. Indications are that they thought the gospel would be preached to all the Jews around the Roman world in a matter of years, perhaps only one or two decades."

    sharrona, you're once again presenting other's work as your own.

  • Craig Clark Boulder, CO
    Jan. 10, 2017 8:54 a.m.

    Too late now. The social agenda of the religious right carried the day for Trump. Now some of them are crying into their Bibles and asking what have we done?

  • CMTM Lake Forest, CA
    Jan. 10, 2017 8:46 a.m.

    Karen R. (Acts 4: 32-35)The early church expected Jesus to return soon. Indications are that they thought the gospel would be preached to all the Jews around the Roman world in a matter of years, perhaps only one or two decades. Then, “the end” would come. The disciples were therefore not unduly concerned with long-term needs.

    This ideal was interrupted later on when persecution came on this congregation that caused its members to be scattered throughout Judea and Samaria (Acts 8:1). We get indications later on in Acts that the believers in Jerusalem came to suffer economic hardship (Acts 11:27-30, 24:17)

    Christians know that Jesus said they would be recognizable by their love for one another (Jn 13:34-35). Christians believe feel a real responsibility to care for the physical needs of their spiritual brothers and sisters.

  • Karen R. Houston, TX
    Jan. 10, 2017 7:20 a.m.

    @ sashabill

    "I am not surprised that the National council of Churches would be taking this position."

    The "no true Scotsman" argument. So compelling...when the exact same charge can be made against the religious that supported Trump. It's an opinion, sashabill, nothing more, and one perspective holds no superiority over the other, no matter how much one believes otherwise.

    "Nowhere, however, are they commended to establish a collectivist-statist political system."

    Acts 4: 32-35 (KJV): "And the multitude of them that believed were of one heart and of one soul: neither said any of them that ought of the things which he possessed was his own; but they had all things common. And with great power gave the apostles witness of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus: and great grace was upon them all. Neither was there any among them that lacked: for as many as were possessors of lands or houses sold them, and brought the prices of the things that were sold, and laid them down at the apostles' feet: and distribution was made unto every man according as he had need."

  • Ranch Here, UT
    Jan. 10, 2017 7:10 a.m.

    Buyer's remorse already, and he hasn't even been inaugurated.

    I love it!

  • Jamescmeyer Midwest City, USA, OK
    Jan. 10, 2017 6:44 a.m.

    Be careful of the headline; people may get the idea that such concerns are representative of most Christian groups, or Christian thought in general. It's like when two Republicans working against the Republican platform concoct a bill and everyone then says "Republicans back whatever bill".

    Given that Obamacare has in fact reduced the care that everyone gets, including the "poor and needy"-and doing so by curtailing people's agency to manage their own property-I would say an extremely Christian thing to do would be to fully and unconditionally repeal it.

    Christ called for US to care for the poor and needy through a change in our heart. He did not tell us to do it by giving our money to Ceasar and having him ensure that it is done. Lucifer would have done a fine enough job of that, but his way was obviously rejected.

  • patriot Cedar Hills, UT
    Jan. 9, 2017 10:31 p.m.

    once again the D-News searches long and hard to find something--anything--anti trump. The alligations are false. Jeff Sessions is an awesome man that has fought long and hard for civil rights and his record proves it. The other men mentioned are likewise awesome men. The hint that his article was a D-news 'hit job" was the Obamacare statement. Anyone who voted for Trump wants Obamacare thrown in the trash ASAP!!

  • Utah Girl Chronicles Eagle Mountain, UT
    Jan. 9, 2017 9:54 p.m.

    Evangelicals did religion in general a disservice for supporting this guy. The only Supreme Being Trump worships is Trump himself.

  • sashabill Morgan Hill, CA
    Jan. 9, 2017 9:39 p.m.

    I am not surprised that the National council of Churches would be taking this position. Christianity - for them and their constituent members - is little more than liberal political advocacy, with a thin veneer of "God talk" mixed in. Christians are indeed commanded and encouraged to look after the needy and disadvantaged. Nowhere, however, are they commended to establish a collectivist-statist political system.

    Between Hillary Clinton's position on abortion, together with the general hostility of liberals toward religious faith, I suspect that many conservative Protestants and traditional Catholics voted for Trump (despite their distaste for him) because they felt that it was what they has to do. Thought I didn't vote for Trump, I can't say blame them.

  • laraine Munfordville, KY
    Jan. 9, 2017 7:19 p.m.

    Some pastors instructed their flock to vote for Trump. Now we all suffer. Anyone who read anything about trump would have realized that he is a bigoted, crude, misogynistic, coarse, bullying narcissist. If he claims to be a Christian, he's lying about that like he does about everything. Thing is, you knew what he was. And you did it anyway.

  • UtahTroutStalker draper, UT
    Jan. 9, 2017 6:56 p.m.

    I wish my brothers and sisters would have been more vocal while he was on the campaign trail, and when they entered the voting booth.

    Same sex marriage will have little to no negative impact on the lives of Christians in this country.

    While having a man who puts corporate profits before people, demonizes different ethnic groups, bullies everyone, and constantly objectifies women is not good for Christians at all. This man is supposed to represent the GOP. The party that supposedly embraces Christian ideals above all else.

    I grew up in the Bible belt. We would identify someone who worships Satan as someone who celebrates himself constantly, values money over people, lies constantly, etc... Now look at who will be leading our country. Dark days are ahead I fear, but perhaps there will be a true revival across our land, and for now that is what many of us can only hope for.

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    Jan. 9, 2017 6:20 p.m.

    While I appreciate and empathise with their concern, it's much too little and late.
    Trump is the man. I don't think it's a stretch to suggest that religious voters are responsible for that in a big way.
    What trump is cannot be seen as a surprise. He has never been shy about it. That religious people found it in themselves to vote for him is a prominent indicator of why I want nothing to do with religion.

  • rdean92 Los Angeles, CA
    Jan. 9, 2017 5:17 p.m.

    Unfortunately, it was these exact folks who put him in office. Good luck with that. Kind of too late now. Really, wait until he actually becomes President.