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Comments about ‘Staying faithful: How the Internet changed the Christian dating game’

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Published: Tuesday, Sept. 2 2014 8:20 a.m. MDT

Updated: Wednesday, Sept. 3 2014 11:35 a.m. MDT

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GaryO
Virginia Beach, VA

I am Christian, but I would NEVER go on Christian Mingle to find a date.

I've seen their commercials, and I have never seen anything quite as offputting as their claim that Christian Mingle will produce "God's Match for YOU." They have no sense of propriety.

Is there anything LOWER than misusing the Lord's name for personal profit. They would have us believe that God is a major shareholder in the company.

"Find Gods' match for YOU on Christian Mingle today."

NO WAY!

How could that appeal to ANYONE with the least bit of common sense or decency?

bass679
Novi, MI

So I tried LDS singles when I was on the market, I was fairly disappointed TBH. Mind you I live in the greater Detroit area so it was mainly an issue where there just weren't really enough single LDS ladies in the area who were also on a dating site. I actually got more dates with LDS ladies on e-harmony where I eventually met my wife who's a non-denominational Christian.

Had I been living in Utah or Colorado though I think it may have worked out well. The important thing is to be up front about your faith and its importance. I listed it on my profile as something very much a part of who I am and I know for a fact it turned off some folk. The important thing is to find someone who shares your values. Being open about your faith makes the process much easier.

The Scientist
Provo, UT

IMHO, The fundamental assumption that is flawed here is that good relationships are built on sameness - birds of a feather flock together, and people who are alike are a better match than those who are different.

Some people may work that way. But for many others, opposites attract, and diversity keeps a relationship interesting.

As an atheist, my active, LDS wife and I have been happily married for over thirty years. She does not demand that I convert (or pretend to convert), and I don't demand that she abandon the faith of her childhood and family.

But there are Christians who make such demands and insist on such ultimatums. This is where religious prejudice and discrimination is most pronounced and divisive.

FatherOfFour
WEST VALLEY CITY, UT

@The Scientist,

I too am atheist, with an LDS wife. You are correct, sometimes opposites attract.

I know it. I Live it. I Love it.
Provo, UT

It is not hard, nor has it ever been, to meet people. Go outside and say "Hello", problem solved. What is hard is that so many people are holding out for "the one" or someone who I can "connect with" on some uber-personal/spiritual level.

God isn't sitting next to you waiting to say "there she is, Now.... GO!"

If you are the one being picky and moving on to the next person all the time... then are you sure the problem isn't you? If 10 years of picky isn't finding someone, how do you expect 10 years of marriage? No one is perfect. No one perfectly compliments who you are. You aren't God's gift to mankind. Neither will your future spouse be. We all are really. Everyone has worth to God. It ought to be the same for us.

Stop thinking about who you want and what you want and start thinking about what you can give. Meeting people is as easy as finding other people who are trying to meet people. If you enjoy each other's company, then start giving & sacrificing already!

sharrona
layton, UT

RE: The Scientist, “... if a woman has a husband who is not a believer and he is willing to live with her, she must not divorce him. For the unbelieving husband has been *sanctified through his wife, and the unbelieving wife has been*sanctified through her believing husband. Otherwise your children would be unclean, but as it is, they are holy. But if the unbeliever leaves, let it be so. The brother or the sister is not bound in such circumstances; God has called us to live in peace. How do you know, wife, whether you will save your husband? Or, how do you know, husband, whether you will save your wife? ( 1Cor 7: 14-16).

I took his advice when I became a Christian and left the Mormon church. Saint Paul is saying that the marriage is *clean and should not be separated. The spouse’s Christian faith may save the unbeliever.

A Scientist
Provo, UT

sharrona,

I need no "saving".

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