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Comments about ‘University of Phoenix founder dies, leaving complex legacy’

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Published: Thursday, Aug. 28 2014 5:45 a.m. MDT

Updated: Friday, Aug. 29 2014 7:40 a.m. MDT

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The Scientist
Provo, UT

"In what is being called the largest settlement in the history of religious discrimination lawsuits brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the Apollo Group Inc. has agreed to pay $1.89 million for the alleged discrimination at its University of Phoenix Online division against its non-Mormon employees."

"52 former enrollment counselors claimed that the University of Phoenix gave members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints preferential treatment for promotions, sales leads, and tuition grants and wavers as well as numerous other perks. The EEOC’s investigation of the for-profit school discovered a prevalence of religion-based hiring and promotion practices there."

"It must also send a written announcement to all supervisors, managers and employee relations personnel declaring "zero tolerance" for Mormon favoritism. According to the consent decree Apollo has signed, any manager found to be engaging in favoritism will immediately be fired. The EEOC will keep close watch on the University of Phoenix for a period of four years to ensure its compliance."

Brave Sir Robin
San Diego, CA

All you need to know about University of Phoenix is in the fine print at the end of their TV ads: "Credits earned unlikely to transfer."

News flash: If an accredited university won't allow you to transfer credits, then you're not at a real university. I would never consider a candidate whose resume has University of Phoenix or any of these other unaccredited, for-profit universities on it. So if you did graduate from one, it's best to just leave it off your resume.

And with the proliferation of online degree programs from accredited universities, there's really no reason any more to even consider University of Phoenix.

GaryO
Virginia Beach, VA

Hey Brave Sir Robin –

“If an accredited university won't allow you to transfer credits, then you're not at a real university.”

The UOP is in fact accredited with Higher Learning Commission. And as you may or may not know, plenty other schools won’t interchange all credits either.

I pursued an MBA through the UOP a decade ago, and I never considered transferring those credits. GE, my employer at the time had a special arrangement with the UOP, and that was just about the only option.

And since I worked full time, and GE was willing to pick up the tab, I hit it hard and earned my degree.

I feel that I personally benefited considerably from the experience.

Sure, an MBA from the UOP isn’t as marketable as one from Stanford, but an MBA from BYU isn’t as marketable as one from Stanford either.

“I would never consider a candidate whose resume has University of Phoenix or any of these other unaccredited, for-profit universities on it.”

That’s OK Robin . . . I would never consider you as an employer.

Laura Bilington
Maple Valley, WA

Gary, in the first place, having only one regional accreditation (the Higher Learning Commission rates only Midwest colleges) does not bode well for an institution with locations across the US. Secondly, their rating has been downgraded from Accredited to Accredited (On Notice), because of concerns about governance, student assessment, and doctoral programs.

"plenty other schools won't interchange all credits either."

We're not talking about religious courses. Many colleges will not accept them for transfer credits. But we're talking about stuff a lot more basic than that. When a university will accept fifty year old transfer credits from Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College but turns down your current studies from the University of Phoenix---there's a problem.

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