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Comments about ‘New Harmony: Mustering a mustard seed of faith in others’

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Published: Saturday, Aug. 16 2014 10:33 a.m. MDT

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Clive
Murray, UT

Amen. Thanks for the reminder.

Karen R.
Houston, TX

To the author:

That was an honest piece, thanks. I feel much the same. And I'm sorry about the pedophile. I think "expert manipulator" comes with this personality constellation. One reason we all fail to identify them for a time.

Thanks again for the nonjudgmental, unflinching candor.

terra nova
Park City, UT

Don't know Jerry, but always like reading his columns. Can't help but like the guy. Stay strong and keep writing Jerry!

The Scientist
Provo, UT

Good, short article, Mr. Johnston.

"In my experience charlatans prosper in places where people feel the most passion — in romance, religion and politics, for example."

Indeed, which is why we should all be extra careful in those areas not to be easily "taken in". As a matter of principle, I tend to grant only a "grain of mustard seed's worth" of faith to passionate persons in these areas - a grain of trust which, once destroyed, is not easily won back.

Regarding romance, I have been the luckiest man alive to have placed a grain of faith in the wonderful LDS woman who has been my beloved wife now for thirty years, and it has grown to a forest of love and trust.

Regarding religion, having nurtured a grain of faith according to "Moroni's Promise" for over three decades, and finding that trust to have been misplaced, I find the passionate expressions in testimony meeting each week to be highly suspect.

Regarding politics, my Party has been hijacked by radicals who have crushed my trust in the GOP.

kvnsmnsn
Springville, UT

Scientist posted:

=Regarding religion, having nurtured a grain of faith according to "Moroni's
=Promise" for over three decades, and finding that trust to have been misplaced,
=I find the passionate expressions in testimony meeting each week to be highly
=suspect.

Scientist, I hate it when people try asking God a question and God takes huge amounts of time to give Her/His answer. If it were up to me, God would answer each question immediately, like God did mine. But how exactly does one determine how long the wait should be, between the point of asking the question and the point of giving up on an answer? Can we really say that it should be within three minutes, or three days, or three years, or three decades?

And if one's goal is to learn God's will in her/his life, and one asks God a question and doesn't get an answer after a long period of time, what exactly is that one's alternative but to just keep waiting for God's answer? What else can that one do to achieve that goal?

GFuller
Mattoon, IL

Scientist: You have nourished the grain of mustard seed size faith in your LDS wife and not been disappointed? I assume you might consider that faithful LDS wife to be some evidence of the truth and value of the restored Gospel.

A Scientist
Provo, UT

GFuller,

My wife is a good person despite her religion, not because of it.

EternalPerspective
Eldersburg, MD

kvnsmnsn

God is infinitely patient with all His children whether they are believers or not. While I cannot begin to understand God's purposes for why some people cannot receive His greater truths, I do know accountibility exists for all truth God reveals to a person.

If God reveals certain truths to a person who is not prepared to receive, it could turn to a testimony against them if they knowingly do not live that truth to the best of their abilities. God is perfectly just and merciful. He will always only give what we are prepared to receive, accept, and live.

There are so many remarkable people who do not receive a greater purity of God's truths. I don't know how to help those people in my life who cannot or do not wish to see things as they really are. I know I am not special that God has revealed Himself to me. But, I do know I must strive to be an example of the light I have been given each day because I never know when my actions might help prepare someone to receive the greater portion of truth.

donn
layton, UT

RE: EternalPerspective. “Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound, That saved a wretch like me. I once was lost but now am found, Was blind, but now I see.”

“To affirm free will is to compromise grace.’ Martin Luther.

When we talk about free will, we are concerned with salvation. We are not interested in whether we have the free will to choose salad or steak for dinner. We are troubled over who is in control of our eternal destiny. By His grace we are saved through the gift of faith which He gives us so that we can believe in Jesus. His grace is a free gift, our faith is a free gift, and our salvation is a free gift given to those whom God has chosen “before the foundation of the world”..

It’s important to understand that salvation is designed to glorify God, not man. Our response is to praise Him for the “glory of His grace.” If we chose our own salvation, who would get the glory?
We would, and God has made it clear that He will not give the glory due to Him to anyone else (Isaiah 48:11).

kvnsmnsn
Springville, UT

Donn posted:

=His grace is a free gift, our faith is a free gift, and our salvation is a free
=gift given to those whom God has chosen “before the foundation of the world”..

Donn, how many people did God chose before the foundation of the world? Do you believe God chose everybody (making you a Universalist)? If you believe God didn't choose to give the free gift of faith (and therefore salvation) to everybody, and therefore by that choice deciding that some people will suffer unbearable agony for the rest of eternity, why should I believe that God would do such a thing? Why should I believe that God would want one single person to not be saved?

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