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Comments about ‘8 types of bullies and how to handle them’

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Published: Thursday, Aug. 14 2014 8:55 a.m. MDT

Updated: Thursday, Aug. 14 2014 2:21 p.m. MDT

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mufasta
American Fork, UT

I agree with a few aspects of the article. It sounds like an invitation for people to blame others whenever they feel inadequate in some way. There is far to much of the "blame the other guy" attitude in our society today. It seems that this silent and insidious trend is more prevalent and damaging to our society than bullying. Perhaps you should pen an article on that.

Utexmom
Flower Mound, TX

Bullying is real, and needs to be addressed today. However, this article falls into the category of "knowing just enough to be dangerous". There is so much more information needed in each category. One must study it deeper to obtain real knowledge that would be helpful. A truly passive aggressive person is rarely a victim, but makes dishonest choices designed to help him/herself at the expense of others.

Seronac
Orem, UT

While the article gives some good advice, sometimes the best rememdy is to stand up for oneself, either by fighting back (literally or verbally) or by publicly scolding the bully. Wisdom is knowing when to do so, and when not to. The overall best remedy for bullying is a healthy self-image and personal confidence.

Utah Native
Farmington, UT

Our teen has been dealing with a "frenemy" bully for years, and I think those are the worst kind: friend in name only, but they're really out to tear you down. Frenemy was found out and has been reprimanded by parents, which only heightened aggression away from parental supervision. I talked to another parent whose son went through the same torment. The bully was in church, scouts, and school with her son. It finally took a powerful threat from a kid on the wrestling team, challenging the bully to a fight at school for his treatment of the victim, for the bully to back down, and that was their senior year. (No fight ensued, but the whole school wanted to see Bully humbled.) After that, the bully became almost cordial. Why is it that violence and threats were the only language that got through to the bully?

A Guy With A Brain
Enid, OK

I hate bullies.

Everybody but the bully hates bullies (that is until THEY get bullied by somebody more powerful than they are). Bullies just make life miserable.

I agree with these ideas in the article, including the comment above that sometimes you just have to stand up for yourself.

When I was in high school I was picked on by 2 kids. Since then I've noticed that I'm much more capable to stand up for myself and get in a bully's face if need be. The last time that happened I ended up literally about 6 inches from a complete stranger's nose, face to face, so close I could see his lip was quivering. Mine were not. I was plenty angry and let him know it and I was not going to back down. I didn't even think about backing down, even if it came to blows.

Afterwards I thought that I should have let his offense roll off my back. Yet on the other hand I was extremely proud that I was not only willing, but able, to stand up for myself.

It's a fine line.

Good luck to us all to find it.

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