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Published: Thursday, Aug. 7 2014 12:00 a.m. MDT

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FreedomFighter41
Provo, UT

How does one not get into debt with the tuition rates and insane textbook costs of today? I find it interesting that those who criticize people with student loans either:

Went to school 50 years ago.
Had a connection (like their daddy was a professor so they were handed out free tuition).
Never went to school.

At the university of Utah, you'll pay over $3 grand per semester just for 12 credits. When you take into consideration fees and textbooks, you're looking at $4 grand. How is one supposed to afford that plus living expenses working their min wage job at Walmat?

george of the jungle
goshen, UT

It's more than a conclusion, it's a commitment.

Grover
Salt Lake City, UT

So you were thinking that Lincoln's famous words about "a government of the people, by the people and for the people" somehow applied to you with your problems? Once and for all the matter of whether the proper function of government is to help its people achieve their dreams or just stay out of the way and be as inconspicuous as possible. The conversation is on.

cjb
Bountiful, UT

Re Larry Jones

Have you considered the possibility of a temporary second job to speed up the process of your getting out of debt?

ECR
Burke, VA

FreedomFighter41 - Now turn to a specialty school like Parsons New School of Design in New York City where my son attended. Undergraduates entering this fall will pay $21,038 per semester for 12-19 credits (full time student) or $1480 per credit. On top of that, pay the cost of living in New York City while you attend school and times that by 4 years of school. It adds up, doesn't it. But it's all about the choices we make. No one is forced to attend school at the campus but if you want to land the best jobs, that seems like what it takes. Education costs have exploded in the last decade and are only getting higher.

pragmatistferlife
salt lake city, utah

A worthy goal Larry, at the same time remember life is a process.

Hopefully there does come a point in your life when first of all you are not stressed by your debt (you have confidence it is manageable) and secondly when you are debt free.

Debt is a fact of American life. Wise debt is the function of informed choices.

Debt and credit are not necessarily the boogey man, used wisely they can enhance life. Even the most solvent of America's giant corporations use debt everyday. Inform yourself, and practice self governance and you'll do ok whether you wind up as a school teacher or a CEO

Confused
Sandy, UT

FreedomFighter41- Stop Whining....

My daughter graduated from the U of U without debt two years ago...

She did not have a rich daddy...
She did not go to school 50 years ago
She did go to college.

What she did was figure a way for her to pay her way through school. It took her five years instead for four, but she worked and paid as she went.

Now she is debt free (Well except her house she just bought), she is putting her husband through school now.

There are ways to do it, but you have to learnt to sacrifice.

2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT

It's great to hear someone thinking about this, and realize that you CAN live debt-free. I'm especially impressed that he learned this lesson so young. It only works if you learn it when you are young. Becoming converted late in life doesn't work as well (the debt is already accumulated).

We should all try to minimize debt. Even our governments and corporations.

They need to borrow... but they should MINIMIZE I it... and they should only do it if they have a PLAN to pay it off.

IMO our Federal Government not only doesn't have a PLAN to pay off the debt they have borrowed for us... they have absolutely no intention of EVER paying it off... or even REDUCING it.

Google "US National Debt Clock" and look at any of them.

$17,614,556,773,206 and that number goes up by millions every day.

That's the kind of number you can't comprehend. And you can't pay off... no matter how hard you try. It's depressing.

And no... one party isn't responsible. CONGRESS (both parties) is responsible for our budget and our dept.

John Charity Spring
Back Home in Davis County, UT

Onice again., the usual suspects have implied that it is the duty of the government to keep them out of debt. In other words, they are entitled to have the taxpayers fund their every want and need.

This idea is preposterous. No one is owed a debt free existence. Those who spend more than they earn have no one to blame but themselves, and they must live with the fact that irresponsible spending leads to stress.

The Real Maverick
Orem, UT

So we have $2 trillion to throw away in an illegal war in Iraq, billions more to throw away in foreign aid, and yet we don't have any money to pay for the college education of our own students?

How does that make any sense?

Curmudgeon
Salt Lake City, UT

@John Charity Spring:
"Onice [sic] again., the usual suspects have implied that it is the duty of the government to keep them out of debt. In other words, they are entitled to have the taxpayers fund their every want and need."

Are you related to Don Quixote? I re-read the comments, and couldn't find one that stated or even came close to implying what you are alleging. Care to identify your "usual suspects" and quote what they said that supports your statement?

The Real Maverick
Orem, UT

So why isn't the government regulating this?

Why can't the government put a cap on the price of textbooks and tuition? It seems like our students are in need of a watchdog. Where's the government when you need it?

Kora
Cedar Hills, UT

The issue is this, everyone should not go to a 4-year college. Prices for tuition are what they are because of demand. The propagation of the idea that everyone needs a college education has been bad for students and the economy.

We are wasting so much money, both in government subsidies and students with loans. I went to class with too many students whose sole purpose was just to get the degree with as little effort as possible. In other words, they were spending money for a piece of paper without the desire to actually learn much of anything. Tell me why that is worth the money spent?

Just look at the number of students graduating and working in jobs that have nothing to do with their degree. Again, wasted money.

The fact is jobs that 50 years ago didn't require a college education can now demand one since so many people are going to college.

Maverick- When did it become the job of the government to make sure everyone has college paid for? It just further increases a false and wasteful demand.

The Educator
South Jordan , UT

"We are wasting so much money, both in government subsidies and students with loans. I went to class with too many students whose sole purpose was just to get the degree with as little effort as possible. In other words, they were spending money for a piece of paper without the desire to actually learn much of anything. Tell me why that is worth the money spent?"

Without that "little piece of paper" they wouldn't have the jobs to begin with.

I have friends with history and psych degrees working in the finance sector. However, without those little pieces of paper they wouldn't have even been given an interview at these financial firms.

Those who graduate with 4 year degrees typically earn more than those who don't.

So those "little pieces of paper" actually do matter. Or you can continue to live in self-denial.

Ultra Bob
Cottonwood Heights, UT

After the next revolution, it may be possible to have the equal opportunity of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. But only if we can realize the government of the people by the people and for the people.

2 bits.

If I owe $17,614,556,773,206 on the day I die, should I care?

American is dying. Not because of the debt, but the debt is a good indicator.

Kora
Cedar Hills, UT

ECR- You don't need to go to the most expensive schools to get the best jobs. I went to a state school in Arizona while doing some coursework at the community college to save money, and still got accepted to multiple medical schools. I chose a less expensive state school for that as well and it did not limit my opportunities at all. I had med school classmates who had gone to Harvard and Yale and were at the same med school as me with my "less prestigious" education. Many of my med school classmates from our "less prestigious" U of Utah, ended up in some of the best training programs in the country.

I bet most of the top people in their fields did not go to the most prestigious and expensive schools, or it did not matter. Nepotism matters more than schooling.

Maverick- A cap on textbook and tuition prices? How about we put a cap on the price of whatever service or goods you provide to limit your income. Would you be okay with that?

Why is it caps are always okay unless it affects your income?

The Real Maverick
Orem, UT

"Maverick- A cap on textbook and tuition prices? How about we put a cap on the price of whatever service or goods you provide to limit your income. Would you be okay with that?

Why is it caps are always okay unless it affects your income?"

Since when has price gouging been okay?

And because your heroic activist judges have ruled that bribery is free speech, it has become impossible to break up the monopolies and force publishers to compete.

If they're going to price gouge then the government needs to put caps on how much they can gouge.

Besides, maybe it's time for these publishers to sacrifice a little bit too? Rather than buy the 600 foot yacht they should only buy the 500 foot one?

Why should the 99 percent of us sacrifice so that the 1 percent can continue to exploit us?

VIDAR
Murray, UT

Debt is the American way. And part of becoming a responsible citizen and adult. It ensures people will keep showing up to work, and not quit their jobs.

Ernest T. Bass
Bountiful, UT

The government loans money to large banks at 1% or less. The loans to students are a minimum of 8%. The great Senator, Elizabeth Warren recognizes that the system is broken and needs change.
Tuition rates is just one more way in which the poor are prevented from making more money.

ECR
Burke, VA

Kora - I have no doubt that what you say is true. I also went to a state school to receive my degree in architecture and if I was looking for a job in certain cities in the west and Northwest my degree would be respected by those firms. But there are firms in the east, especially in New York City, that won't even interview candidates unless they attended an Ivy League school. And so you have to ask yourself if you want to work for those firms. Like you, I have never felt inferior to anyone I've worked with who attended a prestigious school. But those stuffy, prestigious firms, who hire only the Ivy Leaguers, get most of the major commissions and so some people are willing to pay the price to get those jobs.

Another aspect of going to a prestigious program is the networking that goes on and the association you have with other people who are top in their industry. It's a decision that everyone has to make and the more competition in the job market, the more those decisions matter.

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