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Comments about ‘Jordan School District opens doors on its last planned school’

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Published: Monday, July 28 2014 5:34 p.m. MDT

Updated: Monday, July 28 2014 5:34 p.m. MDT

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GoldenGrizz86
West Jordan, UT

Thank you voters for short changing our kids. Sure, let's pack 40-50 kids into a classroom like sardines. I'm sure they'll learn somehow!

freedomforthepeople
Sandy, UT

With thousands of students on waiting lists at local charter schools, the cities should make agreements with charter organizers and open the schools that are needed. The district isn't needed to solve the class size problem.

These partnerships would also allow the cities to decide where to put the schools (which has been a sticking point with the cities when trying to work with the district). In providing charter schools for their families, cities would also be able to provide some parents what they are hoping for, and these parents would move their children out of crowded schools, making them less crowded for those that remain. It would be a win-win-win (cities, parents, students).

It's time for a new paradigm.

Mom of Six
Northern Utah, UT

The problem with overcrowded schools has everything to do with misinformed voters voting down a measure for a bond. As I recall, it would have added a mere $25 per month to house taxes per household. (Most people spend more than that a month on cell phones or movie tickets.) So sad to see see students packed in like sardines into a classroom.
Although everyone is screaming for charters, it has been my experience that district schools are far better. Many charters, at least in our area, have poorly trained staff, parent boards who fire people far too often for small infractions, and/or are not equipped very well compared to district schools. In fact most teachers in charters do not stay, mainly due to poor working conditions. Charter schools are full of teachers with little or no experience. Most parents who try them often don't stay and come back to their district schools. (Again this is in my area, not sure about the Jordan School district area.) This does not alleviate overcrowding problems that everyone likes to shout about!

mcclark
Salt Lake City, UT

Paying taxes used to be a patriotic duty. Now its a dirty word.

freedomforthepeople
Sandy, UT

The charter school numbers simply don't support the allegations of gross mismanagement at charter schools. Why would parents be lining up to get in if they are so obviously inferior and poorly managed? They wouldn't, and they aren't.

The point missed here is why should we coerce citizens into paying more school taxes to support the district schools until all the parents who would rather send their child to a charter school have them in one? It is logical that we would be better off investing in the schools parents want than passing more taxes forcing parents to pay for schools they don't really want.

IndependentThought
Bountiful, UT

@GoldenGrizz86:

Although an elementary school of over 1,000 students is absurdly large, this does not of necessity indicate that students are being crammed into classrooms with one adult managing 40-50 students. On average, K-2 classrooms in the State of Utah have between 22 and 24 students per classroom. Grades 3-6 range from 24-27 students per classroom. Most districts work very hard to keep the student:teacher ratio as low as possible. What an elementary school of more than 1,000 students really indicates is the presence of more highly qualified teachers, para-educators and parent volunteers in the building overall. The goal remains to keep class sizes as low as possible given current school funding models from the State Legislature. I do, however agree with your point that the voters, probably through misinformation and a fear of ANY type of tax increase have shortchanged the students by not allowing the District to have sufficient funding to meet projected growth models over the next 10 years.

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