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Letter: Breeding hate

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  • UtahBlueDevil Durham, NC
    July 26, 2014 7:36 p.m.

    @wrz... so what you are saying is Christ's teachings are conditional, that the early Christians had it easier to love their enemies? I do understand the sacrifice your family would be forced to endure should they loose their family provider, and it would create truly a hardship. But I would counter is if they have a family leader the is willing to let his heart be filled with hate - they are loosing something without even loosing him.

    The Savior when asked how many times should we forgive replied not 7 times, but 70 times 7. (Matt 18:22) I doubt he was talking about a specific 490 times - Rrather saying illustratively many more times than we could count.

    It is hard to argue with your logic in real world circumstances - I understand it completely - but at the same time, the Saviors teachings should be what we strive for at least.

  • wrz Phoenix, AZ
    July 26, 2014 4:05 p.m.

    @JoeBlow:
    "At one point in the ceremony, a letter addressed to him was read aloud. It was signed Barack Obama. Upon hearing this name, the boy laughed and rolled his eyes. When he was then handed the letter, he mocked tearing it up."

    The letter was probably fake. Barack Hussein Obama likely has little time to write a personal letter to a scout receiving an advancement. He's much too busy campaigning. Speaking of which, how is Barack Hussein Obama able to use government assets such as Air Force One, to do political campaigning? This is misappropriation of government assets and a serious crime.

    But, actually the kid might have committed a serious faux pas. He mighta been able to sell the letter with the signature for alotta money sometime down the road.

    @John Charity Spring:
    "This letter ignores one important fact: we cannot fit another 6-8 billion people in this Country."

    The people who are supposed to be managing immigration don't seem to care how many illegals enter. Barack Hussein Obama cares though. He's enjoying the prospects of millions of Democrat votes that will be available in upcoming elections.

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    July 26, 2014 3:59 p.m.

    Don't tell me I 'hate' any of 'em. But I don't have to like 'em:
    President Bush - Good guy to have a beer with. Better painter than president. Not a smart man.
    Republicans - Party of No. No ideas.
    Conservatives - See above. Can tie anything to Naziism.
    Rich people - I will never be one. They can pay their share.
    Corporations - If they really have the rights of people, most should at least be in jail.
    Pro-life crowd - Anti choice crowd. Religious front. People who care deeply for children till they're born, then are willing to send 'em back across the border to die.
    Religious people - Want to share their beliefs on an 'or else' basis. As long as they can tell you what to do, they're fine.
    Tea Party folks - The guys with the misspelled signs and goofy hats? Yeah right.
    Traditional Marriage supporters - They'll never have to marry the same sex. Neither will anyone else, if they get their way.

  • wrz Phoenix, AZ
    July 26, 2014 3:40 p.m.

    @UtahBlueDevil:
    "The savior taught that we should love both our neighbor and our enemy alike..."

    But, what if the enemy wants to kill us. Should there be love in that case?

    You may say, the Savior's enemies killed him. But, wait a minute... He rose from His dead state three days later. If I could do that, raise from the dead state three days or even a week later, I'd have no problem loving my enemy.

    But, as it now stands, if I get killed what would happen to my family who relies on me for support? They'd likely have to endure dire circumstances. Not good.

    The admonition to love your enemy is not very sage advise.

  • wrz Phoenix, AZ
    July 26, 2014 3:13 p.m.

    "This conflict has been going on for thousands of years..."

    True.

    It all started with Abraham and his children. His wife, Sarah couldn't have children since she was too old, supposedly. So, according to the Bible, she gave her handmaiden, Hagar, to Abraham to have a child (son). And she did. Ishmael. Then, miracle of all miracles, Sarah got pregnant and had a son, Issac. The two 'wives' apparently didn't get along very well after that so Abraham sent Hagar and her son, Ishmael away. And there has been contention ever since... down through the centuries. The descendents of Ishmael are primarily Arabs. And the descendents of Issac are the Jews.

    Note to whom it may concern: The above is a recount of history outlined in the Bible. And the quote at the beginning of this comment is from the article.

  • RBB Sandy, UT
    July 26, 2014 9:41 a.m.

    While I agree the boy's conduct was inappropriate, I must respectfully disagree that "We must hold in highest esteem our democratic process, our neighbors, fellow citizens, our constitution, our lawmakers, our leaders and our government." I hold our democratic process, most of my neighbors and, most of all, the Constitution in highest esteem. I do not hold in high esteem politicians or government officials who violate the Constitution or who will not make difficult choices because they are afraid of not getting re-elected.

    Politicians in both parties have failed the American people. We have a debt that is approaching $18,000,000,000,000 because they are more worried about getting reelected that in doing what is best for the country. While I think Bill Clinton tarnished the image of the Presidency with his personal conduct, at least he made an effort to reign in the federal deficit. Our last two presidents have been oblivious to economic disaster they are setting in motion. I do not hold anyone in high esteem who hands out children a bankrupt nation - because they bought votes with the public treasury.

  • Dave T in Ogden Ogden, UT
    July 26, 2014 8:59 a.m.

    Is hate like a virus, it can infect people the worst possible way? It can act like a cancer, it metastasize perfectly healthy cells and you have no idea where it will show up?
    Just like a person, to prevent these diseases (viruses, cancers) to spread is that you must be healthy. Social and economic "health" needs to be injected into families to stop hate. As families are part of the subset of any neighborhood, attitudes within this entity are important.
    As you see the famous picture of God reaching out towards Adam in the Sistine Chapel, yet the fingers not touching, can this represent emotions? The same can be said of a nice smile or a nasty gesture; these also are spread without touching. Just like a person as part of any organization, whether on a sports team or the work place, emotions radiates without actually touching others. Bad attitude by one person can ruin any other people's day.
    It is true what is learned within any family spreads outside the family.
    We radiate attitudes, by the choices we make.

  • Tyler D Meridian, ID
    July 25, 2014 9:56 p.m.

    Obviously I made my point poorly because you missed it entirely.

    I never said religion is the cause of all wars and in fact I doubt it is the cause of most wars. Wars are fought (again, reread my prior comment) over land, money, power, women, control and probably most often throughout history, sheer boredom.

    What religion does, and too a greater degree than any other group thinking, is add fuel to conflicts at unprecedented levels. The Northern Irish are not fighting over the transubstantiation, but the fact is the conflicting parties ALWAYS divide along religious lines – same goes for all conflicts where religious identity is prevalent among the combatants. We don’t need studies to confirm this glaringly obvious fact.

    And you’re confused about what liberals tell us on this subject – liberals almost never claim religion is the problem, as they are far too PC to make such a culturally judgmental assertion. Instead, liberals tell us wars are about oppression and political grievances, which if true we should expect to see legions of Tibetan Buddhist suicide bombers.

    The question you should be asking is “why don’t we?”

  • airnaut Everett, 00
    July 25, 2014 2:00 p.m.

    JoeCapitalist2
    Orem, UT
    Hutterite: "This mess is perpetuated by religion."

    I've got news for you. Hatred is used as a weapon by those who are irreligious as much or more than those who claim religion as justification.

    You don't have to go far to find countless examples of hate being spewed out by those who dispise religion. Sure, you can find plenty of examples of so-called religious people who don't follow the "love thy neighbor" admonition, but if you don't put blinders on, you can find just as many or more examples from people who think along the same lines as you.

    9:18 a.m. July 25, 2014

    =======

    As a Mormon Missionary --

    I never ONCE had an atheist, agnostic, Muslim, Jew or Buddahist spit on me.

    but,
    I can't even begin to count the number of "Christians" who did,
    all in the name of Jesus...

  • jsf Centerville, UT
    July 25, 2014 1:51 p.m.

    "It’s worth noting that Northern Ireland is the last European remnant of what the entire continent looked like 500 years ago." "what people have always fought about; land, treasure, power, control, etc" Which conflict in Europe over the last 500 years were religion based? Tribal maybe but ascribing tribal as the same as religion is your attempt to attack religion and the religious and label them bad. Oh that is what this thread is about breeding hate based on false premises.

  • jsf Centerville, UT
    July 25, 2014 1:33 p.m.

    Tyler D that is not the consensus of these studies. They assert religion has been used as a false blame of conflicts. Japan did not attack Pearl Harbor invade china and other countries on the basis of religion. The war in Iraq, is not religion as we have been told numerous times by liberals (oil?). Hamas does not claim to attack Israel based on religion, they claim it is the illegal occupation of Gaza. In fact look at the numbers killed by religious wars, as opposed to all others and you will see wars fought for non religious purposes far exceed any war you can claim to be based on religion. Germany did not invade Poland for religion, and the Holocaust was not religion based as much as a progressive eugenics policy to make the race pure. Please identify which wars in the past 4 hundred years you feel were strictly religion and then the number of casualties? Prove your hypothesis is not falsely created as an attack against religion. And even though combatants may have different religious beliefs most wars are not based on their religions.

  • Tyler D Meridian, ID
    July 25, 2014 12:58 p.m.

    @jsf – “A Belfast pub is not blown up to assert ‘the Real Presence’ or ‘the Virgin Birth.’”

    Of course not, but that point is irrelevant and fails to see the forest through the trees.

    What provides fuel for these conflicts – which are about what people have always fought about; land, treasure, power, control, etc… - is tribal group thinking. Religion didn’t invent us/them thinking, but adding a cosmic or “eternal” dimension to it was the equivalent of going on steroids. There is no more powerful us/them dichotomy than the saved/damned or holy/heretic, and in all these conflicts you mentioned the common denominator is always religious identification.

    It’s worth noting that Northern Ireland is the last European remnant of what the entire continent looked like 500 years ago. Having largely moved beyond their religious beliefs, Europe today is a peaceful, happy and prosperous society (the problems of Muslim immigration notwithstanding).

    The world’s attachment to bronze-age religion is far more destructive than it is positive – a fact our brilliant Founders recognized more than 200 years ago – and we will be a far better off when it’s gone.

  • jsf Centerville, UT
    July 25, 2014 10:10 a.m.

    "It's all learned in the home." From the poster that in June 2013 told us on these posts, he loathes members of his church that think differently than him. What have you taught your children about members of your church. Has your heart been turned to loving those who differ?

    Hutterite, American Sociological Review article from August of 2007, Brian J. Grim and Roger Frinke find little support for the religion argument. A detailed analysis of countries with multiple religions, or borders between countries of different religious beliefs, finds that they are no more likely to be engaged in conflict than other countries or borders.

    As Time magazine’s Lance Morrow wrote in 1976, “A Belfast pub is not blown up to assert ‘the Real Presence’ or ‘the Virgin Birth.’”

    According to Holsti, For those (wars) since World War II (India-Pakistan, Israel-Arab, Biafra-Nigeria and Syria-Lebanon), none, according to Holsti, had religion as the primary rationale for fighting, even if the wars were advertised as such.

  • JoeCapitalist2 Orem, UT
    July 25, 2014 9:18 a.m.

    Hutterite: "This mess is perpetuated by religion."

    I've got news for you. Hatred is used as a weapon by those who are irreligious as much or more than those who claim religion as justification.

    You don't have to go far to find countless examples of hate being spewed out by those who dispise religion. Sure, you can find plenty of examples of so-called religious people who don't follow the "love thy neighbor" admonition, but if you don't put blinders on, you can find just as many or more examples from people who think along the same lines as you.

  • Ranch Here, UT
    July 25, 2014 7:18 a.m.

    John Charity Spring says:

    "This letter ignores one important fact: we cannot fit another 6-8 billion people in this Country. Since we cannot, the line must be drawn somewhere. If it is not, we will suffer the inevitable consequences of overcrowding and poverty. The American way of life will cease to maintain any of the aspects which make it desirable."

    --- Perfectly apt analogy for the entire planet.

  • LOU Montana Pueblo, CO
    July 25, 2014 7:04 a.m.

    Here in the USA we have many, many organizations that are basically racist and potentially violent hate groups. They provide a basis for cultivating, recruiting and mobilizing like-minded followers, and they are sometimes co-opted by opportunistic politicians for their own narrow purposes. Now put into that mix flag waving, chest beating, gun waving patriotism and you have fueled the flame of justifiable hatred. Now target that hated to the public by using the media, media personalities, political personalities, slogans and catch phrases. Now ad a bit more fuel to that hatred with examples of attacks against your religion, family, economy and country. Now broadcast this fine mixture and pound it daily with the use radio, TV and newspapers.

    Then suddenly, like a seed that lands in good dark soil that has the proper sunlight and water it starts to grow. The roots develop and it pushes through the soil and reaches upward towards the sky. It grows strong and stands in the middle of a garden until it is pulled for being a filthy weed. Once the contamination is removed then the rest of the garden will flourish.

  • UtahBlueDevil Durham, NC
    July 24, 2014 9:52 p.m.

    Lost.... and how do you know Obama "disdains" anyone? By what measure, because he has a different opinion than your own? Do you disdain everyone who doesn't agree with your world opinion? Good grief.... this is very point of this opinion piece. Disagreeing should not be equated to hate or disdain.

    But to far too many, it is an all or nothing proposition. How in the world do people get so dark that they feel they alone have the prescription for all of life's circumstances. What makes one think they are so all knowing they can judge another... to the point of hate and "disdain".

    I haven't read anything by either Bush nor Obama that come close to the level of disrespect and contempt of others than can be found here on a daily basis. Presidents of neither party spew the disdain that a few posters here produce daily. The problem isn't in the White House... the problem lies much closer to home.

    I don't agree with Obama on much, but I disagree with those that would use hate as a method of change far more. It is by far more dangerous to this nations.

  • lost in DC West Jordan, UT
    July 24, 2014 9:31 p.m.

    Hutterite,

    thanks for verifying my comment that you hate religion

    BTW, you do not need a possessive apostrophe for "its". The only time you use an apostrophe with "it" is for the contraction, "it is"

    Wonder,
    why an LDS scout troop? BO has shown disdain for ALL conservative religions - as evidenced by the Obamacare attack on faith. After all, JoeBLow is from SC, in the bible belt. Not a hotbed for Mormonism. Either way, I am glad those parents taught their son to work hard and achieve a goal, and not to allow some interloper who disdains you rain on your parade.

  • JoeBlow Far East USA, SC
    July 24, 2014 8:42 p.m.

    Several things to address

    "A politically charged ultra conservative youth group that belittles politicians who don't share their same right wing views"

    Not at all. The Boy Scouts is a great organization. This kids parents are very right wing and vocal. It is easy to see where he got it. The parents would absolutely feel they are as patriotic as an American can be.

    "I'm assuming that JoeBlow's experience happened at an LDS Scout troop Court of Honor"

    Nope. Not an LDS Scout Troop. And that would not matter regardless. This article was about "breeding hate". That is exactly what I was referring to.

    "You spoke of multiple countries. Did you mean our “country’s elected leader”? you see, "ies" indicates plural. "y apostrophe s (y's)" indicates possessive. "

    Gee Lost. You got me there. Thanks for the correction. Hope that made you feel superior.

    "But what does it say about his scout leaders and those he has associated with?"

    No. Cant pin this at all on the scout leader. I give all the "credit" to the parents.

    We should all examine how what we do and say affects our impressionable children.

  • Twin Lights Louisville, KY
    July 24, 2014 6:54 p.m.

    JoeCapitalist2,

    Just to be clear, I did not specify left or right leaning talk radio. In my book, they all produce low information voters. Period. People who vote based on the say so of the entertainment industry that is talk radio.

    If people want to be well informed they must consider the full range of views (as presented by their advocates, not their detractors) and make their decisions after long consideration.

    There is a great quote from HL Menken: "There is always a well-known solution to every human problem – neat, plausible, and wrong."

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    July 24, 2014 5:27 p.m.

    This mess is perpetuated by religion. We've still got the crusades on the go; that's why Israel has our platinum mastercard for its' defense budget. For a lot of people, including many here, any skirmish in this part of the world is a holy war.

  • JoeCapitalist2 Orem, UT
    July 24, 2014 4:28 p.m.

    Twin Lights: "Hate is bad for America. But it is apparently very good at selling advertising on talk shows."

    ...or for scaring low information voters to the voting booth to vote early and often for big government programs.

  • Wonder Provo, UT
    July 24, 2014 2:09 p.m.

    I'm assuming that JoeBlow's experience happened at an LDS Scout troop Court of Honor. That's what makes his story even more sad to me -- that this boy was perfectly comfortable mocking the President in an LDS setting because he's sure that most of the people in the meeting agree with him. That's what's sad to me about the story.

  • lost in DC West Jordan, UT
    July 24, 2014 2:02 p.m.

    JoeBlow,
    You spoke of multiple countries. Did you mean our “country’s elected leader”? you see, "ies" indicates plural. "y apostrophe s (y's)" indicates possessive.

    BO gets as much respect as he earns; disrespect and disagreement is NOT contempt or hatred. If it were, many of the liberal posters here could be accused of hatred of conservatives.

    LD_ Lib
    Yes, the same could be said about hating conservatives, president Bush, Senator Lee, Rep Chaffetz, and ANYONE with whom you disagree. (religion in the case of HVH and Hutterite). Are YOU the father setting the tradition?

    Esquire,
    Did you make similar comments when bush was being excoriated daily, or is just when BO is shown the disrespect he has earned that you comment?

  • FreedomFighter41 Provo, UT
    July 24, 2014 1:55 p.m.

    @ Joe Blow

    A politically charged ultra conservative youth group that belittles politicians who don't share their same right wing views? Where have we seen this before?

    This child has completely missed the whole point of scouting. When I was in scouting, it was all about building friendships, learning values, and respect for others and nature.

    If scouting has forgotten this to become some sick right wing movement where intolerance is valued, then I hope it continues to diminish in popularity and participation. My young children can join athletic teams, bands, and clubs to receive a better education.

  • John Charity Spring Back Home in Davis County, UT
    July 24, 2014 12:15 p.m.

    This letter ignores one important fact: we cannot fit another 6-8 billion people in this Country. Since we cannot, the line must be drawn somewhere. If it is not, we will suffer the inevitable consequences of overcrowding and poverty. The American way of life will cease to maintain any of the aspects which make it desirable.

  • FanOfTheSith Vernal, UT
    July 24, 2014 12:15 p.m.

    As in "Monkey see, Monkey do" teaching or even leading by example can go either way.

  • Ultra Bob Cottonwood Heights, UT
    July 24, 2014 12:03 p.m.

    The problem is not hate, The problem is love. Love of life and all it brings. Sometimes called greed. Greed comes from the strongest built in drive to survive that exist in every living creature. It is responsible for the vast different kinds of life forms. Life forms try every strategy, every avenue that presents itself, some are successful, some are not.

    In human beings, the ability to think ahead brings a whole arsenal of weapons to us, Hate is just one of those weapons. We use hate to disable those who would threaten our survival comfort as an alternative to war. The neat part about hate is that we don't have to do any thing to our enemy, hate is a weapon that we build in ourselves.

    If we would defeat the hate in ourselves we need to analyze our need for such a weapon, and check to see if our enemy is really a threat to our survival. If we would defeat the hate in our enemy, we must convince him that we are not a threat to his survival.

    It's sort of like that bit of turning the other cheek.

  • Tyler D Meridian, ID
    July 24, 2014 11:45 a.m.

    Hate (or anger) is a pretty universal emotion and to the extent we can recognize our own part in keeping it alive there is a chance it can be overcome.

    The problem with many religions is they codify and even make hate a righteous attribute of God. The OT often reads as a biography of a deity struggling to deal with this emotion, and even on occasion having to be talked down from the ledge (Numbers 14). And in our own time, how often have we heard “love the sinner, hate the sin?”

    These views only make it all the more difficult to ever get beyond hate as they perpetuate the false notion that it’s caused by others and that our acting out the emotion is morally righteous.

    I can think of no problems in life that cannot be more effectively handled without hate than with, as many great leaders throughout history have shown (e.g., Jesus, Gandhi, MLK). Good religion testifies to this truth but bad religion is making the problem exponentially worse.

  • All Lunacy Salt Lake City, UT
    July 24, 2014 11:06 a.m.

    Agreed!

    The same can be said about hating --

    President Bush
    Republicans
    Christians
    Mormons
    Caucasians
    Catholics
    Conservatives
    Tax payers
    The middle class, the working class, the church goers,

    it’s all learned in the home.

  • Twin Lights Louisville, KY
    July 24, 2014 10:31 a.m.

    Hate is bad for America. But it is apparently very good at selling advertising on talk shows.

  • Spangs Salt Lake City, UT
    July 24, 2014 10:25 a.m.

    I must echo the sentiment of Esquire. Even if that boy independently researched his position with respect to governance (which I doubt), he is missing a crucial part of what it means to be American. We must hold in highest esteem our democratic process, our neighbors, fellow citizens, our constitution, our lawmakers, our leaders and our government. If we all decide not to, we are ultimately doomed to the fate of Pakistan; a lawless, warring aggregate of ideological fanatics.

  • Tyler D Meridian, ID
    July 24, 2014 10:17 a.m.

    Hate (or anger) is a pretty universal emotion and to the extent we can recognize our own part in keeping it alive there is a chance it can be overcome.

    The problem with many religions is they codify and even make hate a righteous attribute of God. The OT often reads as a biography of a deity struggling to deal with this emotion, and even on occasion having to be talked down from the ledge (Numbers 14). And in our own time, how often have we heard “love the sinner, hate the sin?”

    These views only make it all the more difficult to ever get beyond hate as they perpetuate the false notion that it’s caused by others and that our acting out the emotion is morally righteous.

    I can think of no problems in life that cannot be more effectively handled without hate than with, as many great leaders throughout history have shown (e.g., Jesus, Gandhi, MLK). Good religion testifies to this truth but bad religion is making the problem exponentially worse.

  • JoeCapitalist2 Orem, UT
    July 24, 2014 9:18 a.m.

    LDS Liberal:

    Why did you limit your targets of "hate" to only leftists?

    If you were truly concerned about stopping all the hatred out there, your list would have included some of the following:

    President Bush
    Republicans
    Conservatives
    Rich people
    Corporations
    Pro-life crowd
    Religious people
    Tea Party folks
    Traditional Marriage supporters

    Or are you like some who believe that racism can only exist as white people discriminating against blacks - not the other way around? Liberals can and do teach hatred toward those who disagree with them ideologically.

    If you are really concerned about hatred, preach against ALL hatred, not just your side of it.

  • LDS Liberal Farmington, UT
    July 24, 2014 9:00 a.m.

    Agreed!

    But -- this also applies to hatred of:

    President Obama,
    Our Government,
    Environmentalists,
    political parties,
    Muslims, Jews,
    blacks, hispanics, asians,
    Gays, Lesbians,
    the poor,
    etc.

    In the Book of Mormon,
    it's called living "in the traditions of their Fathers."

    Meaning -- they learned it in their homes, from their parents.

  • ECR Burke, VA
    July 24, 2014 8:56 a.m.

    JoeBlow - Thank you for your illustrative remark. A 14 year-old boy who has supposedly dedicated his life to living in accordance with the principles lived by other Eagle Scouts. What does it say about his parents, indeed? But what does it say about his scout leaders and those he has associated with? It is cetainly a sad commentary when one so young has learned to disrespect the president even on front of public audience. What will he be doing as an adult?

  • SCfan clearfield, UT
    July 24, 2014 8:50 a.m.

    Maybe this tolerance some of you seem to be talking about should be aimed at places like Berkeley California, and other universities, where they hate the U.S. Military so much, recruiters are not even allowed on campus on in the city. And since this is DN, do I even need to remind some that there are places where Missionaries will not go for fear of the hatred they will have pointed at them? And don't try to say that the anti military attitude was all based upon the don't ask don't tell policy. If you try to use a political issue as a valid reason to hate, then the opposition to Obama is justified, as he is a political issue with which many disagree for good reason.

  • FreedomFighter41 Provo, UT
    July 24, 2014 8:46 a.m.

    @ Joe Blow

    Think that boy would have done the same thing had Bush or Romney been President? Why or why not?

    Parents, where do you think he learned this from?

    Leaders, what does it benefit to know how to do a knot when you don't even know the basic principles like respect?

    Being a vet myself, I would have made a scene. I didn't sacrifice my time and blood so that punks can make fun of the President. I don't care who the President is and which party he's from. You show him/her respect. You can disagree without being disagreeable and disrespectful.

  • Esquire Springville, UT
    July 24, 2014 8:39 a.m.

    @ JoeBlow, your story of the scout made me want to cry because hate has become so pervasive in our country. I've been around since Eisenhower, and there have been Presidents that I did not vote for and with whom I had differences. But I always respected them because they served in the office and they were selected by the People. It is so sad that this approach is in the past, that hyper-partisanship is the rule, and that the opposing party has sworn to make an incoming President a failure.

  • The Real Maverick Orem, UT
    July 24, 2014 8:12 a.m.

    I think a lot of this is on the media.

    The media has discovered that it's more profitable to place a bunch of good looking girls and have them bash the President for ratings. The media has found that it's more profitable to say shocking things on am radio rather than be civil and rational. The media has learned that you get more ears and eyes if you're a rodeo clown rather than a reporter.

    The media isn't helping to inform, but to mold and shape our hate. So sad.

  • LDS Liberal Farmington, UT
    July 24, 2014 7:50 a.m.

    Agreed!

    The same can be said about hating --

    President Obama,
    Tree-Huggers,
    Democrats,
    Muslims,
    Blacks,
    Hispanics,
    Gays,
    the poor, the sick, the needy....etc.

    It's all learned in the home.

    BTW --

    In the Book of Mormon,
    It's refered to following "in the traditions in their Fathers."

  • JoeBlow Far East USA, SC
    July 24, 2014 5:42 a.m.

    "which tells me the people are being taught to hate, perpetuating the problem"

    I recently attended an eagle scout ceremony for a 14 year old scout who had earned the rank.
    At one point in the ceremony, a letter addressed to him was read aloud. It was signed Barack Obama.

    Upon hearing this name, the boy laughed and rolled his eyes. When he was then handed the letter, he mocked tearing it up.

    How sad is this? One can credit his "patriotic" parents for instilling such contempt and hatred for our countries elected leader and for completely missing one of the main principles in boy scouts.

  • ECR Burke, VA
    July 24, 2014 5:41 a.m.

    Great letter Jan. And that concept also illustrates the great responsibility of parents in teaching correct principles to the children they raise in their families. It's something we should all think about before we spout off with hateful rhetoric about anyone, even in the assumed privacy of our homes. Little ears are listening and they will perpetuate the thoughts and character of the people they look up to - their parents. Let's be careful.

  • UtahBlueDevil Durham, NC
    July 24, 2014 5:18 a.m.

    Couldn't agree more.... whether it is Israeli and Palestinians, or Democrat and Republican, our capacity to hate has nothing to do with who is in charge but far more so the attitudes found in the home. The savior taught that we should love both our neighbor and our enemy alike - all during times of much more strife and oppression than we have now. Our attitudes are not determined by people elsewhere, but in our own homes.