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Comments about ‘BYU-Idaho, Rexburg experience flooding after heavy thunderstorms’

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Published: Wednesday, July 16 2014 8:00 a.m. MDT

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hockeymom
Highland, UT

Love to see the students bonding and working hard and building memories.... too bad it's over a flood! Good Luck to Ricks College (oops! BYU-Idaho) - my Alma-mater!

Kjirstin Youngberg
Mapleton, UT

Hmmm. What kind of voltage has H.A.A.R.P. been tossing into the ionosphere lately? These changing weather patterns are not natural; it is because scientists are experimenting with things they do not understand. Geoengineering in an attempt to manipulate weather patterns is a huge mistake. Masking the earth with artificial clouds will not cool it. Many scientists are now coming forward to say it was a mistake, and that we need to return the earth to mother nature to cure herself, before it is too late. Heavy flooding like this in Rexburg is not natural. We had a monsoon last night in Mapleton. Our lawn and reservoir loved it, but it's not right in a desert climate.

Most Americans are not even aware this is happening, or the full extent of the damage it has done. A media blackout means we must do the research ourselves. Look up geoengineering, H.A.A.R.P. and if you can stomach it, check into Joni Mitchell's disease. The only way to stop this insanity is to know what is happening.

Lone Eagle
Aurora, CO

Uh..... what's a "normal" weather pattern? We have a very miniscule nano-second like record compared to the actual time span for the history of the earth. After all, isn't Mapleton well below the top layer of old Lake Bonneville? And what about all those shoreline markings on the sides of the mountains? Doesn't that indicate that the lake level changed and stayed for a while? And what of the Great Salt Lake now? Well below the outlet north of Logan, yes? So what is normal?

Twin Lights
Louisville, KY

We have thousands of scientists telling us climate change will produce more erratic weather (no, no one storm can be pinpointed to climate change) but then we are worried about HARP which no scientist is worried about?

I think I hear my old science teachers weeping.

DHuber
Palmyra, NY

What kind of a school insists on holding classes when so many student have flooded apartments???

Kjirstin Youngberg
Mapleton, UT

Lone Eagle, we have recorded regular Hot/Cold, Wet/Dry cycles dating back to 600 B.C. Those are the normal weather patterns. About sixty years ago, somebody decided to start seeding clouds for rain. It has now become a multi-billion dollar covert industry. Not only is it messing up our weather patterns, it is destroying the health of many people and animals who have inadvertently come into contact with the barium and aluminum oxide and other chemicals used in the process.

No scientist is worried about H.A.A.R.P.? Just for grins, Twin Lights, do a google search of "scientists worried about H.A.A.R.P." and see what pops. 5,560.000 links say differently.

Many people say this isn't happening, which is ludicrous, since the UK has openly admitted it. I only suggest doing some research. I found the airline mechanics comments on the varied uses of "waste systems" and the mechanics who service them especially enlightening. Pilots can deny doing any spraying, because they aren't even aware it has been installed as part of their static discharge system. What a sneaky way to run a jetliner.

Arizona1
Tucson, AZ

First, for Kjirstin Youngberg, monsoon flooding is actually quite common in a desert climate. I was in Rexburg during the storm and aside from the hail, the storm reminded me very much of the monsoon storms in Tucson, Arizona.

As for DHuber, BYU-Idaho has instructed its professors to appropriately accommodate students who were affected by the flooding. It has also instructed departments to do the same for professors. And finally, even though it was a big storm, most students did not have their apartments flooded, just some on the bottom floor where drainage was not properly planned. With the growth in Rexburg and more large parking lots put in over the last few years, I think there was some poor drainage planning that exacerbated the problem. And finally, most students who lost some possessions, probably didn't lose too much, because after all, they are STUDENTS.

Medical Student
Glendale, AZ

@Kjirsten Youngberg,
A high number of google hits does not the truth make.
Why are anti-science conspiracy theories that are so popular in Utah? It seriously gives Mormons a bad name. The government is not manipulating the weather, vaccines don't cause autism and DoTerra and Young Living essential oils don't cure anything.

I am a BYU-Idaho graduate. I lived in Idaho for five years. Summer thunderstorms are very, very normal there. Given how common they are, it was only a matter of time before one came along that was a bit bigger than most and dumped more water than usual. Flooding happens. That's why there are retention basins in the low-lying neighborhoods in Rexburg near Highway 20 and the Snake River.

Lone Eagle
Aurora, CO

@Kjirstin Youngberg

Wow! Records from Rexburg dating back to 600 BC. I wasn't aware of (1) there was a continuous population in the Upper Valley (Rexburg area in specific) with records dating that far back, and (2) before now flash floods were uncommon, especially in Rexburg.

I am not doubting the cloud seeding operations. I know they happen. And it almost sounds like your HAAAAAARP is an off-topic topic.

What I am trying to point out is that it not that unusual to have some severe weather in Rexburg.

About 40 years ago, I was working in the fields on the farmlands just east and south of Rexburg (on the Bench area) when a storm of similar proportions as reported came through. It was rather sudden, dumped copious amounts of rain and included marble-sized hail which was rather painful to be in. This kind of storm in Rexburg is not unheard of.

Kjirstin Youngberg
Mapleton, UT

Sling all the arrows you like; I will be vindicated once Edward Snowden's files are all released.

I'm not on top of the whole essential oils thing, but an elderly woman in our ward was given just days to live. Her daughter brought her to her home for her final hours, took her off of all her "scientific" pharmaceutical medications, and made her comfortable with essential oils. The old lady got well. It's been over three years now. She ended up renting a home of her own again, and even does her own shopping and driving, so perhaps there's something to it.

P.S. I had all my children vaccinated, but did my homework there, too. What I advocate is getting the whole story before blindly jumping into the fray.

A friend at BYU-I is staying home from classes today to help her friends on the lower floors dry out. No matter the cause, it's a mess.

Frozen Fractals
Salt Lake City, UT

@Kjirsten Youngberg
Cloud seeding is occasionally used and tested (think Beijing opening ceremonies), but it has shown no ability to produce substantive changes and has absolutely nothing to do with flooding in Idaho. Storms happen. HAARP has no influence on that and amusingly announced in May that they're shutting down this year (while also being a very transparent organization with frequent visiting scientists at the facility).

"do a google search of "scientists worried about H.A.A.R.P." and see what pops. 5,560.000 links say differently. "

I put in "Lebron James goat farmer" and got 16.8 million results.

FT1/SS
Virginia Beach, VA

I was at Ricks 30 plus years ago. Looking at all the photos and videos, their's nothing I recognized. Looks like the kids were having fun, despite the losses.

Flashback
Kearns, UT

Having went to Ricks in 1976, right after the Teton Dam break, and then again 80-81, I've seen this type of weather several times, including summer time.

The big problem is all of the new upper campus building and the temple. Back in the day when that was wheat fields, the water soaked in. Now it has nowhere to go but down hill through the campus.

Need bigger storm drains.

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