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Comments about ‘Letter: Teaching about food’

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Published: Wednesday, July 9 2014 12:00 a.m. MDT

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deniron
Effurun/Nigeria, 00

Truly it may not be beautiful in the persons eyes.but good reasoning with the person of the nutritional value or especial with the children should be taught just after the spiritual lessons in family home evening should go to the kitchen to do some practical cooking or preparing other source Preferably, the person who hate the meal should prepare it for those who loves it. Parents should remember that the children will leave one day and should instil in them what parent have that he will provide.

lost in DC
West Jordan, UT

when I was a kid in grade school we had to eat a certain amount of our lunch before we could go out for lunch recess.

When I hear how kids will just throw away nutricious food rather than eat it, and so we need to give the kids only what they like to eat, I have to shake my head and wonder how it ever got to this. If you want the kids to eat healthy, provide healthy choices and REQUIRE them to eat a certain amount before being released for lunch recess. Go back to what worked in the past.

Curmudgeon
Salt Lake City, UT

My mother tried to get me to eat overcooked brussels sprouts and eggplant, on the grounds that they were good for me, and made me sit at the table until I cleaned my plate; sometimes I was still sitting there an hour after everyone else had left, and gagged on it when I finally forced it down. I resisted then and I still hate those foods. Thank goodness they were never served at school lunch. And I do not allow them at the table in my home.

There are some foods that no one should have to "learn to eat."

SlopJ30
St Louis, MO

For the most part, kids' pickiness is a learned behavior. I was never all that picky, but my mom (the primary cook in the family) was a competent but bland cook, and we rarely experimented. I didn't know what I was missing until my mission, when all of a sudden I had all kinds of East Asian dishes put in front of me.

Now I have four kids, and both parents are, IMO, pretty good cooks. There's variety, attempts at new ethnic dishes, lots of vegetables prepared in different ways, and no tolerance for a refusal to try something. And, really, they hardly ever resist a taste of a new dish anyway. Why? They've seen that new and "weird" might actually be "good."

Curmudgeon, I feel for you -- not even being sarcastic here -- it would be rough having a mother who couldn't cook. It really is a skill. I loved Vietnamese food on my mission, but there were a couple of Viet ladies we'd visit who managed to ruin everything. It was almost comical, but they were trying. They just didn't have a clue.

Curmudgeon
Salt Lake City, UT

SlopJ30:
In defense of my mother (may her soul rest in peace), she was an excellent cook and I still miss most of her home cooking--just not the b. sprouts and eggplant. I lay most of the blame on those particular foods (which have to be disguised with spices, etc. to be at all palatable), not on the cook.

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