Comments about ‘Why doctors are making a new push for parents to read to kids — even infants’

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Published: Thursday, June 26 2014 4:15 a.m. MDT

Updated: Thursday, July 3 2014 10:16 a.m. MDT

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wdrobarts
Westfield , IN

Sorry Deseret, but you lost me at Hillary Clinton. I know this is not the Tribune, but still......can't stand the sound of nails to a chalkboard....and that exactly what that names represent to a lot of people I'm sure.

george of the jungle
goshen, UT

The real facts of life I learned are [if you have a mustard seed of faith] are God exists, he's smarter than any one and he loves me. The thing is that mustard seed of faith to speak out to him.

Go2
Utah, UT

When you don't have time to read to your kiddos, talk to them. Chatter away to them about what you are doing, what you are seeing, etc. You are trying to develop their listening vocabulary in those first years. Talk talk talk - not in a baby talk way or with 'baby words' just regular vocabulary.

Life101
Anywhere, CA

Start talking and singing to your baby as soon as you find out you are expecting. As the baby grows, the more you talk and sing, the more movement. The baby recognizes your voice. Special times.

DTanner
Memphis, TN

wdrobarts:

Please take your red-colored glasses of and evaluate the ideas for their own merit not for the person who passed the message on. Millions of us know it does "Take A Village" to raise a well adjusted and socially adapted child.

Ultra Bob
Cottonwood Heights, UT

I'm not quite sure where the scam is, but my belief that doctors are businessmen tells me that reading to a infant doesn't make any sense except in the pursuit of profits.

Any activity of interface between the child of any age is good and stimulates learning. But in the case of the very young the need is for action and participation in short bursts to deal with the very limited attention span.

Gildas
LOGAN, UT

I think, and seem to find, that talking to children slowly and with emphasis, feeling, and context, develops their vocabulary. I would avoid teaching too many words at once and recommend repeating basic words often. Point to something and repeat the word that idenfies it.

Talking provides the introduction of lots of everyday words and enables CONTEXT in immediate surroundings. Reading about fairies, pixies and elves does not supply a useful vocabulary. Leave those things, if you want them, 'til later on when you have laid the groundwork of communication on immediate matters of interest and utility to your child. I think, though, that if you can get hold of a set of those old "Dick and Jane" books that might be helpful to read to little children, since they build a good basic vocabulary gradually, using basic words. They worked well for millions of people, although they may lack the immediacy and intimacy of just talking, loving conversation with mothers and fathers and siblings. Repetition and lots of love work. Be prepared to spend a little time and enjoy it. I am NOT a doctor or teacher; believe it if it works and ignore it if it doesn't.

BleedsBlue
Salt Lake City, UT

Ultra Bob
Reading to your infant makes perfect sense! It is never too early to get them used to the rhythm and cadence of language, as well as building vocabulary, a critical building block for future success in school. Read to them and talk to them. Talk talk talk to them! I AM a teacher and I beg parents and grandparents to start this practice as soon as possible and continue it during their children/grandchildren's childhood years. The advantage to children who have a strong base of vocabulary when they enter school cannot be discounted and the disadvantage to those who do not have this is so crippling.
I encourage the reading of more sophisticated books than Dick and Jane as the child matures, because listening vocabulary outstrips speaking vocabulary. They understand what they hear more than what they can put into their speaking vocabulary but those words will eventually translate to the speaking vocabulary as well and when they encounter that word in print as they are learning to read, they will more likely be able to decode it. How can you know what a word is if you have never heard of it before?

CynicJim
Taylorsville, UT

A parent reading a story has a greater impact for good than does the same story read from a TV program. The parent reading establishes a greater sense of confidence and ownership than does an animal figure or hand puppet.

PP
Eagle Mountain, UT

people have been raising kids for 6000 years. Do we really need some buys bodies with no kids telling us what bad parents we all are yet again?

Did I get this right - reading to your kids is good? Wonder how much tax money it took to tell us that.

They have a keen eye for the near obvious.

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