Comments about ‘Not many races in Tuesday's primary election’

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Published: Sunday, June 22 2014 4:05 p.m. MDT

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Utah_1
Salt Lake City, UT

The 60% works, allowing a shot of a challenger to eliminate an incumbent and yet requires a challenger to be a strong candidate.

Based on the GOP State party released sheets 2000 to 2012 for state wide races or congressional races, At 60%, threshold to avoid a primary, 1/2 of contested races went to primary.

They tracked 44 races, 14 of which were not contested for the nominee.

In 2012, there were more races and more primaries.
Hatch/Liljenquist, Dougall/Johnson, Swallow/Reyes, McCartney/Valdez, Okerlund/Painter, Vickers/Anderson, Perry/Galvez, Redd/Butterfield, Anderegg/Moore, Handy/Crowder, Macdonald/Bagley, Sagers/McCoy, Kennedy/Nitta, Muniz/Hendrickson, Stratton/Murray, Christofferson/Kane, Greene/Stevens, Layton/Daw, Nelson/Wright, Westwood/Carling, and Crockett/Winder, to name a few. Not every race had a primary nor should it. Most of those were GOP primaries.

Increasing the number of primaries won't increase turnout. Vote by mail does, as do get out the vote campaigns.

My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

What is very unsettling about the Republican primaries is it denies non party citizens to vote on local and state wide bond issues and laws and judges which we all have a right to vote on. I wanted to vote on non partisan items and the polling site makes voters sign and register as party affiliates republicans to vote on general elections referendums.

This violates citizens right to vote on issues related to government and public interests. I was very offended at this process and I am still offended by the fact that partisan politics is denying many non republican voters on non partisan ballot related issues.

This method of controlling everyone's rights and limiting them to republican votes is unconstitutional and other parties are denied their voting on general issues.

Lolly
Lehi, UT

Basically, people have to understand that this election is the only vote they will have especially in Utah County. You vote now for your choice or get whomever comes out on top since it is Republican territory and with some exceptions the Republican always wins in the General Election. So, it is now or never.

People "cry" over the loss by a well known politician in a Primary, but it comes down to the fact that they allowed him to lose by not voting. This is also the system that many are pressing for in Utah over the caucus method and both have serious shortcomings.

A Warning: If the person you favor loses tomorrow it will be because someone didn't feel it important to vote.

Utah_1
Salt Lake City, UT

My2Cents,
Call the County Clerk. You are wrong. You don't have to register as a Republican or Democratic Party Member to vote in the General Elections and the items you mentioned are not part of the primary. No one can vote on the judges until this fall.

Cherilyn Eagar
Holladay, UT

More primaries do not more voters make. In Salt Lake County this year there is ONE main race - County Assessor. That one will not bring out a lot of voters, regardless of whether a caucus convention system or an open primary. The point is that the current caucus system protects the right of a private corporation to decide how its brand will be used and whether that corporation will be allowed to decide who gets a vote within that corporation. What's unsettling is that the Utah State Legislature and the Governor have signed into law an unconstitutional law that sets a dangerous precedent that could be applied to YOUR private business. I wonder if Larry H. Miller and that family's privately-held, family-owned businesses would like the legislature to decide who their corporations' boards and presidents should be? Would they want their corporations to be in the same boat as CMV wants for private political organizations? Would they want an open primary system to determine who their next chairman of the board should be?

John Locke
Ivins, , UT

If we lived in China, Russia, Iran or any other totalitarian country, 99.9% of the vote would be (forced) out. So, if you are satisfied with everything on the ballot, you have the right not to vote. But, when you get what you don't vote for, don't complain.

GZE
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

2cents,

You only have to register as a Republican to vote in their partisan primary. You do not have to register with a party to vote in Democratic primary nor to vote on any non-partisan issues.
And no party registration is required to vote in a general election.

Irony Guy
Bountiful, Utah

Please vote. Low turnout = wacky results. As Yeats said, 'The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity," and the worst possible voters control the rest of us if there is a low turnout.

VST
Bountiful, UT

@My2Cents,

I don’t know what is happening in your County, but here in Davis County, if you are not affiliated as a Republican, you will just receive a separate ballot for the non-party affiliated issues and candidates (if there are any for your voting district) at Primary voting time.

As for receiving a Republican ballot at Primary time, you will also receive a Republican ballot if you are a registered Republican (and if there are any Republican Primary races for your voting district). If you are not, then as a non-registered Republican (per Utah law and Republican Party voting rules) you are not entitled to vote in the Republican Primary. But you will be allowed, at the General election in November, to vote for any Republican nominee, as selected in in the Republican Convention (60% minimum votes received) or selected during the Republican Primary election if you so choose.

VST
Bountiful, UT

@Cherilyn Eagar said, “…the Utah State Legislature and the Governor have signed into law an unconstitutional law that sets a dangerous precedent that could be applied to YOUR private business.”

What on earth are you talking about?

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