Quantcast

Comments about ‘Zero-tolerance behavior policies in schools prove harmful, study says’

Return to article »

Published: Friday, June 13 2014 7:30 a.m. MDT

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
Shimlau
SAINT GEORGE, UT

A friend of my son, was in a class where there was something stuck in a computer keyboard. he pulled out his pocket knife, opened it, extracted the offending debris, closed and repocketed his knife, and was promptly suspended for having a 'weapon' at school. In his family's business, a pocket knife was every bit as much a tool as a pen or pencil. No one was ever threatened by him. No one even knew he had this 'tool' until he used it to help others in the class. This was due to a "zero tolerance policy" utilized by the school. Fortunatley, cooler heads prevailed and he was reinstated and finished his education. It could just as easily have gone either way.

The Wraith
Kaysville, UT

Shimlau

That is a perfect example on why zero tolerance policies simply don't work in the real world. As a teacher I see things like this happen often and I just shake my head.

RedWings
CLEARFIELD, UT

Schools should move away from these zero tolerance policies on students.

They should implement them against teachers who physically assault and bully students. The case recently of the teacher attacking a 6 year old student in the hallway (on camera) is a prime example. If a teacher assaults a student, they should be in jail for it. Not protected.

My daughter was drug down the hall at Clearfield high by a teacher because she forgot to take out a lip piercing. I contacted the Vice Prinicipal and the whole thing ended up being swept under the rug. It was all I could do to not go in their and confront the guy myself.

I don't discipline my kids with physical force, so I would never stand for some stranger doing it either....

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments