Comments about ‘Do lower taxes actually convince people to move?’

Return to article »

Published: Friday, May 30 2014 4:25 p.m. MDT

Updated: Monday, June 2 2014 3:21 p.m. MDT

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
TRUTH
Salt Lake City, UT

No Lower taxes don't make people move......its the HIGHER taxes that make people move.....just look at France!

patriot
Cedar Hills, UT

well Texas is growing like crazy and NY is shrinking. What does that tell ya?

Blue
Salt Lake City, UT

Sure, by this reasoning, you guys will love Somalia.

SignsoftheTimes
Apo, AE

According to Orzag, I'm not what he would consider "most" people. Last year I was offered a promotion that I turned down. Why? Because the job was near the DC beltway in MD. My other choice was to return to Utah. I picked Utah. My pay would have been $15K more per year in a place that has really high taxes and cost of living. I went to the Kaiser Foundation website to read data on what tax rates were and other areas that affect quality of life. Sure I would have made $50K more money after taxes after 4 years, but all of it would have gone to a much higher cost of living. Taxes were higher and so was everything else. I didn't hesitate turning down that offer.

Others have since asked me about moving to Montgomery, AL. When I was last there in 2007, that city had a 10% sales tax. Whoa! Get this, if you're retired military with 1% VA disability rating, your kids go to state universities for FREE!!!! Heck no. People can pay for their own kids like me. Taxes mean something. If the author is right, then the US is done.

GaryO
Virginia Beach, VA

If low taxes caused people to move, then why are there so few people in Wyoming, Alaska, and Nevada? none of those states have a state income tax.

In fact, Wyoming is the least populous state in the Union.

Jobs cause people to move.

If Corporations relocate because of low taxes, than people will follow, but low individual income taxes don't seem to make people move.

Larry Lawton
Star Valley, WY

Although we spent most of our professional lives in California, we left the very day we retired, and high taxes and burdensome regulations were a large part of our decision to relocate. Years ago, a friend of mine moved his entire business to Utah, even though his entire client base was in California. He'd done the math, and could pay shipping for his goods and airfare for employees easily out of cost savings. One of our sons turned down a much-needed job because the employer demanded he create a Nevada address. The Nevada company just couldn't make it paying California Worker's Compensation Insurance rates for even one employee.

DN Subscriber
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Tax rates are a very visible factor, but they are also indicative of the overall climate of a state. Those which tax heavily usually have many other disincentives for living there, as well as restrictions on economic and personal freedom.

But, among the very wealthy, which usually means very hard working people, taxes are indeed a major consideration.

UtahBlueDevil
Durham, NC

Truth... ok, lets look at France. France per capita has a higher immigration rate than does the US. California, with its high taxes, is still one of the top fastest grown states as measured in immigration to the state and GDP growth.

What has changed in Texas is some to do with taxes, but more to do with growth in the energy sector. The Dakota's exploding population growth is not due to low taxes, its because of jobs. The city I live in North Carolina has some of the highest taxes in the state, and has the highest growth rate of jobs in the state.

Extracting out a singular variable and trying to extrapolate that it is the sole driver behind any event shows a high level of either ignorance or unprofessionalism. In fact, For example France's population has nearly doubled in the last 50 years - just slightly slower than the US growth rate as a percentage. Not the narrative talk radio wants... but one supported by numbers, not political rhetoric.

Shaun
Sandy, UT

I would never move to Texas. I do not care if they were giving money away.

On another note, one has to be aware that no state income tax does not necessarily mean an over all less tax burden. The property tax on a house like mine in Texas would have an 8k property tax bill vs the $1800 I have in Utah.

Schnee
Salt Lake City, UT

@patriot
Texas also has the highest rate of uninsured people in the nation so it sure isn't creating many high quality jobs since those usually come with employer healthcare. Education is pretty awful in the south, as are their highest in the nation poverty rates (Mississippi, Alabama being 1 and 2).

patriot
Cedar Hills, UT

re:Schnee

first of all Texas is NOT Mississippi or Alabama and the education in Texas is light years ahead of ether state. Get your facts straight. Second I don't think this discussion had anything at all to do about insurance ...did it?? People are LEAVING the liberal stink holes of NY and LA and other north eastern liberal run cites with their GIGANTIC TAXES and they are indeed MOVING to Texas and the Dakotas and yes Utah because they can actually start up a business or run an existing business without the state government taking ALL their profits via taxation. This is a FACT!!! The governor of Texas was actually in California recruiting business's to leave and come join the prosperity of Texas.

you liberals just HATE to face the facts that people are leaving your HIGH-TAX states in record numbers. Liberalsim DESTROYS Capitalism . You can keep your social welfare and phony fairness along with your record unemployment numbers and your record food stamp numbers.

We don't want or need them!! We know that FREEDOM from taxation ALWAYS produces prosperity from the lowest class to the upper class. A rising tide lifts everyone!!

liberal larry
salt lake City, utah

Utah is a fairly highly taxed state (ranked 28th best by the Tax Foundation) but we wouldn't dream of moving to a lower tax state like Arizona (ranked #2), just for tax purposes. (although we may move out of Salt Lake Valley to find cleaner air!)

We wouldn't even move from our retirement place in Kanab right across the boarder to Fredonia to pay lower taxes!

Public services require adequate funding, and as long as we feel that Utah government is well run, would never move for tax reasons.

Maybe things are different in the Forbes 400 crowd, but I don't know of even one person moving to lower their taxes!

Shaun
Sandy, UT

@Patriot. What do you think will happen to Texas when all those liberals move there because the companies moved there?

Rick Perry is going to turn Texas Blue.

dalefarr
South Jordan, Utah

Just speaking for myself, when I retire I intend to move to a state with lower taxes. If I had more family in Utah, I'd probably stay.

UtahBlueDevil
Durham, NC

"well Texas is growing like crazy and NY is shrinking. What does that tell ya?"

Texas has an economy based on oil, and New York doesn't? Just maybe?

"Liberalsim DESTROYS Capitalism "

Um... liberalism and capitalism are not antonyms. You can have both.... and both exist in a lot of places doing just fine. You can be pro women's rights, and conservative on spending. You can be for better mass transit, and still be for free trade. You can be pro gay rights, and own a shop that is very capitalist.

This crazy notion that people who aren't deeply "conservative" are also any capital is bizarre. Some of the wealthiest business people on this earth liver very "liberal" life styles.

Lets not confuse social values with economics. Being very sensitive to the needs of the poor or minorities doesn't mean one doesn't want to make as much as they can while working. The two have absolutely nothing to do with each other.

It like trying to make the association that being a conservative means low government spending..... history has shown us that is far from the truth as well.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments