Quantcast

Comments about ‘Richard Davis: Is it time to put down the cellphone?’

Return to article »

Published: Wednesday, May 28 2014 12:00 a.m. MDT

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
JoeBlow
Far East USA, SC

"according to a recent Pew Research Center survey, one-quarter of couples admit that one partner has been distracted by a mobile phone when they were together."

And the other 75% are either 80 or lying.

BYUalum
South Jordan, UT

This is exactly how I feel about electronic devices! I often feel like "second fiddle" when talking to someone, and they suddenly pull out a ringing or beeping cell phone and respond to it without so much as a word of apology to me.

I would like to add to this leaving them at home when you go to Church. (gasp) I see too many people playing with devices when they should be listening and otherwise participating during any part of the service. Even though appropriate at times, they are easily a distraction when bored or otherwise. Also offering electronic video games for small children as behavior solutions at Church instead of teaching them to be quiet and reverent sets a precedence for them as they grow older.

Thank you for a "heads-up" article worth considering!

LDS Liberal
Farmington, UT

Agreed.

When I invite others to our home,
I ask them to put away their phones or lap-tops,
unless they are "working" on something important or "needZ" to take the call.

If facebook, tweets, or text messaging someone else is more important than being with our family,
it is not welcome in our home.

Unless someone is bleeding, it can wait.

Besides -- It's just rude.

And don't even get me started about those who SHOULD be driving!!...

2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Parents and children should work together to determine what parts of the day they will be available to be contacted by cell phone, and what periods they won't.

Family Home Evening, or Dinner time for instance. There needs to be an understanding that they won't be answering calls or texts during that time. Then they can tell friends, so they won't EXPECT them to respond during those times.

Bed time is another time their friends need to know they won't be available by cell phone.

Some people think that's ridiculous... but do you want your teenaged daughter's boy friend to have access to her when they are in bed?

Cell phones don't go to bed with my sons or daughters... they can check what happened overnight and respond in the morning (not be accessible to anybody who wants to call or text them all night).

They need their rest, they don't need to hear or see what friends are doing or thinking in their beds at night.

Many of their friends DO take cell phones to bed with them.. and end up on them all night... Sometimes getting into trouble.

Howard Beal
Provo, UT

There is such great power in ignoring the phone when it rings or the text when it comes. More people ought to try it...

Mormon Book Worm
----------, UT

Gosh, do you know how awkward it is when you're trying to say something to someone and they have earbuds in, and their music is on full blast?

Answer; really awkward.

It's not just texting and social media; it's music and games also. You can't talk to someone who's playing Flappy Bird (still don't really know what it is) or is blaring 1D (ugh, I don't like them) at full volume.

We're not a very social people.

Dr. K
Salem, UT

I have no issue with what Richard has written or the prescription he suggests. I do take issue with the tone (deliberate or not) of vilifying technology as if this generation was the first one distracted from person-to-person interaction by the latest advances in communication. If you asked the same survey question 40 years ago but substituted "television" for "mobile phone" you'd get similar results. 60 years ago run the survey with "radio." 100 years ago substitute "newspaper." 200 years ago substitute "book." Every new communication technology brings a level of disruption to whatever the norm was when the technology showed up. We just have to remember that these changes are not new to this generation or to the latest technologies.

Put another way, if the scene in the Davis household had included everyone quietly reading books, would the conclusion still be the same -- that they need to put the books down and be more social?

2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT

@Dr. K,
I really don't think it's the same problem (or at least not to the same extent).

100 years ago people were not losing their personal connection with other people, because they were reading the news paper all the time. That's what we're talking about here.

Sure there were problems introduced by the popularization of news papers... but not THIS problem. You don't walk around all day with our nose in a news paper, oblivious to other people around you.

patriot
Cedar Hills, UT

Twitter - Facebook - utube videos - internet games - chat rooms and then throw in your iPhone and all fun apps that dominate your attention. Who has time for family? We aren't just talking kids here anymore - adults are just as consumed by all of these things as much as kids. I have to wonder what would happen if the internet when down for a week. Can you imagine the panic!! People would have to actually read books and talk to each other. Good grief bring down TV (Dish and cable networks) and you would have the end of life as we know it. Back in the 60's we had 5 channels on TV. No internet and no smart phones. The smartest phones were the ones with buttons instead of a dial. Ed Sullivan and Leave it to Beaver on TV along with Disneys Charlie the Lonesome Cougar and The American Sportsman. Thank goodness we don't live like that anymore. Kids forced to play outside everyday....horrible torture!! No sex on tv. Impossible. You had to order dirty magazines that came in the mail in a brown paper cover. How insulting.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments