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The rich tradition of conservatism is in danger

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  • ordinaryfolks seattle, WA
    May 26, 2014 9:52 a.m.

    There is a thread of thought here that asserts that 80 or so years of "liberal" policies have brought the country to ruin economically. And I have a bridge in New York to sell to these people. Talk about drinking the kook-aid.

    A truly liberal policy would have us on a one payer health insurance system. We have mixed up system that primarily relies on employer based free enterprise insurance. We have been in multiple wars (which we don't pay for as we go) instead of pursuing pacifistic goals. Full civil rights are not available to all Americans, and we restrict the right to vote to minorities. We allow too much religion into our policy making. People are still hungry, and good jobs were exported overseas with the pursuit of corporate profit. Wall Street, that bastion of conservatism, makes policy for all of our financial oversight mechanisms rendering them useless. Politicians listen to corporate America, and not mainstream America (we have the best legislators that money can buy).

    At best you would call the last 80 years a moderate conservative governmenance. But to call it a liberal is an inane interpretation of fact.

  • Flashback Kearns, UT
    May 26, 2014 8:26 a.m.

    As a Conservative I'm:
    Not in favor of Gay Marriage, but I also believe that the government should stay out of the bedroom. If course all you libs will brand me as hateful because I don't support "equality".
    I'm for smaller government, but also more responsible government. In other words, the government shouldn't be the be all end all for everyone.
    I'm for lower taxes, and yes, that includes the rich. They made their money, let them keep it.
    I'm for term limits. Sorry Orrin.
    I'm for the right to say and criticize anyone or anything you want, except for yelling fire in a crowded theater.
    I'm for the right to posess firearms. Guns are not the problem. Sometimes it is the people using them, and the Santa Barbara shootings should verify that. Signals were missed in that case.
    I don't support Abortion except where the heal of the mother is at risk or rape or incest.
    I'm for people being responsible for what happens to them. Good or bad.
    And many other things.

  • What in Tucket? Provo, UT
    May 25, 2014 7:27 p.m.

    This is certainly a conglomeration of baloney. Red states like Utah and Texas do well because of conservative principles. How anyone can be horrified at lower taxes and a simpler tax structure, less red tape, and a balanced budget is beyond me. Seems like common sense. Free market economy is the best welfare program believe it.

  • LOU Montana Pueblo, CO
    May 25, 2014 7:27 a.m.

    I live a very conservative life and many people mistake me for a conservative republican. In a group or in person I have listened to conservatives. When they speak politically their conversations are full of racial blaming and the destruction of those who disagree with them. Everyone is at fault except who they support. The name "Conservative" has become the name of very hateful and ignorant people who only care to serve themselves.

    Mary is right about one thing, it is very sad that we don't have real conservatives.

  • Screwdriver Casa Grande, AZ
    May 24, 2014 1:56 p.m.

    Quote "The rich tradition of conservatism is in danger"

    There you go, there could not be a more fitting or attractive headline for a group of people dedicated to the notion that everything is getting worse and they are the last "good" people left on the face of the Earth to stop it all.

  • one vote Salt Lake City, UT
    May 24, 2014 9:09 a.m.

    Selling out to tea party and talk radio cements a party in the un-electable corner. But bloggers can ride it daily.

  • Pops NORTH SALT LAKE, UT
    May 24, 2014 7:03 a.m.

    It's unfortunate that so many view Mary Barker's editorial as an opportunity to demonize others and promote polarization of society rather than to talk about real issues in a civil and enlightening manner. If one were to judge the political left - whether one calls it "Democrat" or liberal, or whatever - on the basis of comments appearing in the DN on a regular basis, and particularly following this article, one would be forced to conclude that in endeavoring to point out the cartoonish behavior of their political opponents all they have really done is to demonstrate that cartoonishness is no respecter of party.

  • LDS Liberal Farmington, UT
    May 24, 2014 12:20 a.m.

    No Mike Riahards, RedShirt, J Thompson, wrz, L White...

    2bits is the lone ranger....

  • the truth Holladay, UT
    May 23, 2014 7:34 p.m.

    @JoeBlow

    Nice but fallacious try.

    Your definition is more the extreme left definition of a conservative view of a liberal.

    Conservative are not extremists. That is a hateful leftist label to attack and minimize them.

    Conservatives know quite well who the NEO-Liberals are and who the progressive big government republicans and democrats are.

    And are quite able to and have identified them correctly.

  • The Hammer lehi, utah
    May 23, 2014 4:52 p.m.

    This article is more partisan blog rant than an unbiased representation. Mary Barker doesn’t understand the rich tradition of conservatism. Her musings display contempt not sympathy for conservatism.
    She despises conservatives and belittles/ignores their concerns about a government which grows and absorbs more power daily. This is the cause of the tea party’s rise from obscurity. When one half of the government ignores the other half you are liable to push people to the extremes in both parties. Using extremists like Todd Akin as her example is a gross exaggeration of the people within the movement.
    Conservatives defend equal taxation and equal opportunity for all despite wealth status. They despise attempts by government to interfere with equal opportunity hence opposition to Medicaid expansion and Federal Reserve policy which only helps rich bankers.
    Lastly, after 80 years of liberal policies our country has turned into a crony capitalist society. It is not the fault of conservative tea partiers but of liberals who demanded compromises and negotiations which led to bailouts and quasi tax breaks. It’s liberals who hate capitalism why don’t you rant about them?

  • Mister J Salt Lake City, UT
    May 23, 2014 4:43 p.m.

    to John Charity Spring

    "Let us be clear. The conservative tradition is being ruined by notions of political correctness."

    Right!? Because the Tea party, Sarah Palin, AM Talk Radio, & Rupert Murdock's propaganda channel have done nothing to damage the conservative movement?

  • Hank Pym SLC, UT
    May 23, 2014 3:42 p.m.

    re Blue early this morning...

    ["Conservatism... values intelligence, education and high culture."

    Well there's the whopper of the day.]

    Agreed. Going by the above values, the average conservative would be Niles or Frasier Crane.

    That said, I was flipping the channels last night and stopped to watch All in the Family... Archie Bunker is today's typical conservative... Norman Lear was spot on 35 yrs ago.

  • There You Go Again Saint George, UT
    May 23, 2014 3:37 p.m.

    Mary,

    Going, going...gone.

    As one DN reader earlier opined...

    Mary has clearly hit one out of the park...

    Boom.

    Thank you for your accurate portrayal of the caricature conservatism/republicanism has become in the United States.

    The only thing I might add....

    the Republican brand is so polluted...

    Republicans decided to call themselves conservatives.

    Labeling oneself a conservative is one thing...

    Simply acquiring a new and improved self-selected brand...to somehow avoid association with what Republicanism has become...

    is quite another.

  • Utefan60 Salt Lake City, UT
    May 23, 2014 3:24 p.m.

    I thought that I must have been reading the Tribune this morning when I read this enlightened article! Wow. Even my mother called me and said what a great article that was. It was intelligent and insightful.

    Sometimes I'm shocked that the DN will print an amazing article like this written by an articulate person with credentials.

  • Irony Guy Bountiful, Utah
    May 23, 2014 2:48 p.m.

    Mary is thinking of conservatives like Burke and Hobbes, thoughtful and intelligent people. They were very, very far from the know-nothing, anti-scientific, anti-intellectual, anti-education, pro-pillaging, pro-violence absurdity that masquerades today as "conservatism" and is actually a very old tendency in America--the "paranoid tradition," as the great historian Richard Hofstadter called it.

  • Ninjutsu Sandy, UT
    May 23, 2014 1:45 p.m.

    @2 bits
    "You can be a Democrat and not be Liberal. And you can be a Republican and not be Conservative. And you can be "Conservative" and not be either..."

    Exactly. And right now, "neither" is what I am. I feel like I am a conservative without a party. Maybe that's for the best.

    -----------

    @Madsen Hall Magic
    "Democrats have been right for decades"

    Your irony completely eludes me. You listed a bunch of presidents that you called "Democrats." I assume you were being sarcastic (except that Carter actually WAS). Then you listed what Hillary Clinton would do if elected. Were you still being sarcastic? Are they all Democrats or aren't they? Are you implying that the author of the post was saying this?
    Please clarify.

  • Madsen Hall Magic Centerville, UT
    May 23, 2014 1:07 p.m.

    I completely agree. Democrats have been right for decades. Eizenhower, Carter, Reagan, Thatcher, Washington, Lincoln...all good Democrats. It should be obvious from the list of great Democrat leaders who the best party is.

    If Hillary gets elected we'll all get student loans erased. Fanny Mae will pay my mortgage, plus put solar panels on my roof. Democratic principles are free stuff for Americans. Cradle to grave government care. That means the government will pay funeral costs too.

    Vote Democrat. Vote Hillary.

  • David Centerville, UT
    May 23, 2014 1:03 p.m.

    Very good piece here. Conservative principles were correctly presented in the article, and are still the answer to nations, societies, and governments. But because of selfishness and greed, the worship of false gods, and embrace of false doctrines (religious, economic and societal) our society has lost its moorings.

    Not only do we need a return to true conservative principles, but we also need a return to God and His teachings and principles, doctrines and commandments.

    Society will thrive when we are founded upon true principles.

  • UtahBlueDevil Durham, NC
    May 23, 2014 12:14 p.m.

    "Conservatism may be defined as an orientation to public life that emphasizes the limitations of human nature; that cautions prudence in public policy; that promotes responsible behavior; and that values intelligence, education and high culture."

    The DN never lets me down.... good source of giggles.

    If this is the definition of Conservatism, then is the author trying to make the point that liberalism is divined by letting go to the most basic human instincts, reckless abandon in public policy, promotion of lawlessness, embraces ignorance, and demeans education and finds the arts wasteful. Did I miss a quantum shift in the universe?

    I kind of thought conservatism was based on patriotism, traditional value, small government and a strong national defense.... but guess I was wrong. Who knew.... perhaps the next big platform for the Republicans will be funding of education and the arts... even supporting public broadcasting.... I had this whole thing backwards!

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    May 23, 2014 11:52 a.m.

    Ninjutsu,
    Then you should focus on trying to being a "Conservative" (not a Republican or Democrat).

    You don't have to be either of these... to be a "Conservative".

    We need to quit pretending being partisan for either party... makes us either... (Conservative or Liberal). It doesn't.

    You can be a Democrat and not be Liberal. And you can be a Republican and not be Conservative. And you can be "Conservative" and not be either...

  • Ninjutsu Sandy, UT
    May 23, 2014 10:40 a.m.

    Ms. Barker,
    Almost thou pursuadest me to be a Republican.

    Truly, if the Republican party valued "conservatism" as this author defines it, I would unhesitatingly align myself with it.

  • Fred44 Salt Lake City, Utah
    May 23, 2014 10:25 a.m.

    2 bits,

    Lets look further at your post:

    "If there's a flaw with liberal thinking today... it's expecting everybody to fit your stereotypes for them. Especially political rhetoric inspired stereotypes.

    Quit seeing people as the GROUP/Cast you have place them in... and then expect them to always behave according to your stereotype.

    Quit seeing people as their GROUP. As your stereotype for them... IF you must judge, judge them as individuals... and you will come closer to reality".

    Aren't you saying that all liberals think the same way? Aren't you stereotyping with the first statement the very same way you criticize liberals in your next several sentences? If you believe that both party extremes have this problem why did you only mention the "flaw" of the liberals?

    You might be surprised at how many things you and I agree on, but for many on this board I am a liberal because I wont vote straight republican, because I believe that Mike Lee is Jason Chaffetz are not good for Utah or America. I agree with everything you say above except you limiting stereotyping exclusively to liberals.

  • JoeBlow Far East USA, SC
    May 23, 2014 10:01 a.m.

    Liberal Definition in the 21st Century = Anyone who is, at a minimum, a smidgen to the left of the far right.

    For those who disagree, define a moderate. (as well as a RINO)

    I actually consider myself fiscal conservative and social moderate. But, per the definition above, I am labeled a liberal.

  • Schnee Salt Lake City, UT
    May 23, 2014 10:00 a.m.

    This is the sort of conservatism that defines people like Hatch, Bennett, McCain, and others. People in Congress or the Senate that I disagree with on many things, but respect nonetheless.

  • Ford DeTreese Provo, UT
    May 23, 2014 9:41 a.m.

    Odd that my two favorite "conservative" commenters have absolutely nothing to say about this fine editorial.

  • Kent C. DeForrest Provo, UT
    May 23, 2014 9:39 a.m.

    Again, Deseret News, do not, I repeat, do not let Mary Barker get away from you. She is spot on in her analysis. Every Republican candidate for office should be required by his or her constituents to sit down and read this editorial every day during the upcoming campaign. And every voter ought to read this too, repeatedly. And if the "conservative" candidates aren't really conservative, they should, figuratively speaking, be taken out behind the woodshed and given a few splinters where it hurts to sit.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    May 23, 2014 9:20 a.m.

    @Fred44,
    I didn't call ANYBODY a "Liberal". I think it's up to everybody to self-identify if they want that label (and many have). Some posters have already proudly boasted about being "Liberal"... so it's not me calling them a "Liberal". I'm just taking their word for it.

    It was probably bad to assume the letter writer was a "Liberal". I'll leave that up to her to decide if she thinks she's a liberal. But the statement (about stereotyping) was based on posts from people who very frequently boast about their being "Liberal" (not an assumption, or me calling them a liberal, they BRAG constantly about being a liberal).

    ====

    But like I said... generalizations and stereotypes don't always fit (I realise that... it was the point I was trying to make).

    That's why I'll never assume or pretend all Democrats are "Liberal" (I know they aren't). I won't even assume they use the literal definition or the political definition of "Liberal" when they boast about being liberal. We all know the political definition of "Liberal" is different than the classical definition of "Liberal" (Same for "Conservative").

  • Tyler D Meridian, ID
    May 23, 2014 9:17 a.m.

    @pragmatistferlife – “This article is the perfect example of why so many of us have said many times that we use to be Republicans until…”

    Exactly!

    What’s ironic though, and perhaps this is simply a function of our two party system which merges diverse political movements – in this case Libertarians and Social Conservatives, is that they will quickly throw personal liberty under the bus if they think doing so advances a moral project they believe in (e.g., banning gay marriage or all abortions).

    When liberals do this (healthcare, minimum wage, etc…) it is a gross violation of personal liberty, yet conservatives are blind to their own inconsistency in upholding the same limited government values.

    But as the saying goes, a partisan is someone with the crystal clear vision of a one eyed man.

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    May 23, 2014 9:14 a.m.

    Conservatism today isn't good ideas and good leadership. It's a blend, ideology, religion, and unabashed redneckism, if one can coin a phrase. Is the republican party conservative? Somewhat, but hopefully it can cure itself.

  • Spangs Salt Lake City, UT
    May 23, 2014 8:51 a.m.

    Excellent essay. This should be mandatory reading for conservatives and liberals alike.

  • mcdugall Murray, UT
    May 23, 2014 8:48 a.m.

    An exceptional piece!

  • andyjaggy American Fork, UT
    May 23, 2014 8:48 a.m.

    This is a great article and pretty much sums up why I no longer identify as a Republican. It's been a long while since there has been anyone I've been excited to vote for. Romney would have been one, if he hadn't pandered to the extreme right in an attempt to win.

  • Fred44 Salt Lake City, Utah
    May 23, 2014 8:38 a.m.

    2 bits,

    You said: "If there's a flaw with liberal thinking today... it's expecting everybody to fit your stereotypes for them. Especially political rhetoric inspired stereotypes". So are you calling the author and the majority of posters Liberals? If so isn't that the same stereotyping that you decry when it comes to republicans and conservatives?

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    May 23, 2014 8:35 a.m.

    @GaryO,

    Modern "Liberalism" is a cruel caricature of true Liberalism. It's a grotesque rendering that greatly accentuates the most peculiar, unfortunate, and unkind characteristics inherent to Liberalism, while it minimizes the decent, sensible, and attractive qualities.

    Modern "Liberalism" is a malformed, deformed, distorted, twisted, gnarled, mangled, misshapen, hideous representation of true Liberalism.

    And tellingly, its adherents can't tell the difference.

    ========

    What I'm trying to point out is... that the exact same things COULD be said about Liberalism (and Democrats).

    Your same arguments (while true) could be said about modern political "Liberalism" as well. Modern "Liberalism", and Political "Liberalism", and Democrat "Liberalism"... It's not the same as the dictionary definition of being "Liberal". It's a caricature of what being truly "Liberal" means.

    She could have written the exact same article about "Liberalism" and "Democrats".
    So don't be too smug...

  • Happy Valley Heretic Orem, UT
    May 23, 2014 8:21 a.m.

    John Charity Spring said: "The current administration in Washington has put enormous pressure on universities to silence all speech and writing that does not meet the administration's view of what is politically correct. This includes any speech or writing which supports traditional moral values."

    Do you just make stuff up now?
    How have they done this and what evidence do you have?
    Is there a letter on White House letterhead that say to stop any Moral Speeches?

    To be taken seriously, you should probably not bare false witness against the POTUS continually while talking of high morals.

    Deja vu

  • pragmatistferlife salt lake city, utah
    May 23, 2014 8:17 a.m.

    This article is the perfect example of why so many of us have said many times that we use to be Republicans until... Saying that does not in any way say that I or any one else thinks the Democrats have it right. It does say that conservatives and ergo the Republicans have completely lost their way.

    Personally (and maybe it's just me) I think conservatism has lost it's way through an obsession with personal liberty. Personal liberty is an easy sell when you're trying to promote a personal agenda. Anything from lower taxes, gun rights, bans on abortion, fossil fuel energy, religious agendas, etc. etc. all fit very nicely in the envelope of you're taking my liberty.

    As the author points out conservatives have always been the champions of liberty but within the context of society. Not any more. It's just me, me.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    May 23, 2014 8:14 a.m.

    Mary makes the common mistake of assuming Republicans are the keepers of Conservatism.

    Republicans are NOT necessarily "Conservatives"! So you don't define "Conservatism" by looking at Republicans.

    SOME Republicans are "Conservatives" (just as SOME Democrats are Liberals). But not ALL Republicans are examples of "Conservatism", and not ALL Democrats are examples of being "Liberal".

    ====

    We need to quit looking to the various political parties that are SUPPOSED to fit our stereotypes... and not only expect them to behave correctly (for our stereotype)... but also expect them to portray purity in that stereotypes that we attribute to them (Liberal or Conservative).

    If there's a flaw with liberal thinking today... it's expecting everybody to fit your stereotypes for them. Especially political rhetoric inspired stereotypes.

    Quit seeing people as the GROUP/Cast you have place them in... and then expect them to always behave according to your stereotype.

    Quit seeing people as their GROUP. As your stereotype for them... IF you must judge, judge them as individuals... and you will come closer to reality.

    Conservatism is what it has always been (same for "Liberalism"). It just isn't canonized neatly into political parties like you expect...

  • ordinaryfolks seattle, WA
    May 23, 2014 8:10 a.m.

    This is an amazing piece of dissection of the problems with conservative thinking today. I could easily respect any conservative viewpoint which came from the traditional conservative. I can not say that today, since our conservative political party (and most conservative thinkers) resort to the kind of debate and opinion formation that is described here.

    It is interesting that the one comment so far to dispute any of this, and defend today's conservative thinking resorts to an argument that has nothing to do with the patterns of thinking and argumentation of today's conservative. Political "correctness" is a silly argument advanced by conservatives to claim the mantle of victimhood. It is not an argument against rationalism.

  • Karen R. Houston, TX
    May 23, 2014 7:57 a.m.

    Ms. Barker knocked this one out of the park. In conjunction with the judicial opinions coming out of the SSM debate, this gives me hope that America does still house the kind of thinking that is grounded in "concrete reality; what is happening right in front of our eyes." This doesn't preclude anyone's speculations about or need for something beyond the concrete. It just puts things in their proper order.

    And, yes, let's absolutely develop policies with an eye to what we know about "the limitations of human nature." This nonsense about deregulation willfully ignores what we as a species have proven to be true time and time again: that we will do things we would not ordinarily do if we don't think anyone is watching. So why, why would we think that deregulating the financial system is a good idea?

    Can we please, PLEASE get real again?

  • slcdenizen Murray, UT
    May 23, 2014 7:39 a.m.

    Somebody call the brethren, a SL Trib piece was accidentally published in the DN. Common sense and restraint? That's not the conservatism that we know in Utah. We know under-the-table dealings, deference toward the wealthy, blaming the poor for their circumstances, and high minded self-righteousness. Why is this lady trying to rock the boat?

  • John Charity Spring Back Home in Davis County, UT
    May 23, 2014 7:37 a.m.

    Let us be clear. The conservative tradition is being ruined by notions of political correctness.

    Political correctness is an outright ban on any speech, writing, thought, or even idea that might be the least bit offensive. This has led to the even more false I notion that, because someone has the right to be free from any offense, no one has the right to express ideas that any possible person could possibly take offense at.

    The current administration in Washington has put enormous pressure on universities to silence all speech and writing that does not meet the administration's view of what is politically correct. This includes any speech or writing which supports traditional moral values.

    How ironic that the dogma of political correctness has been used as a sword to attack all dissenting viewpoints. Indeed, only one view is given freedom of expression. Too many conservatives have allowed themselves to be silent in the face of this attack.

  • Gandalf Salt Lake City, UT
    May 23, 2014 7:14 a.m.

    Great op-ed. Thank you for providing the political theory backdrop. The GOP has strayed far from his philosophical and historical roots.

  • FT salt lake city, UT
    May 23, 2014 7:08 a.m.

    When I think of conservatives, Teddy Rosevlet comes to mind. Which is why it has become more and more difficult to support today's GOP. Any party that hands it microphone over to radicals like Mike Lee, Ted Cruz or intellectually chanllenged politicans like Sarah Palin or Michelee Bachman has lost my support. The GOP won't win back the WH until they win back their party.

  • LDS Liberal Farmington, UT
    May 23, 2014 7:00 a.m.

    Mary Barker's article is a MasterPiece!

    This is beautiful - and it hit the nail right square on the head!

    FYI -- The Republicans -- commandeered by the radical Tea-Party - comes across more like the villagers in Monty Python and the Holy Grail with it's "witch" trial, than pragmatic, problem solving, sitdown with both sides to issues, share opposing views, and plan an intelligent solution, Statesmen.

    Jon Huntsman Jr. is the closest "conservative" the GOP has, and look how they treat him.

  • GaryO Virginia Beach, VA
    May 23, 2014 6:53 a.m.

    Are Republicans Conservative? Well . . . yes and no, but mostly no.

    Republicans are "Conservative."

    And Modern "Conservatism" is a distorted representation of true Conservatism.

    It's like a misproportioned cartoon compared to a portrait.

    Modern "Conservatism" is a cruel caricature of true Conservatism. It's a grotesque rendering that greatly accentuates the most peculiar, unfortunate, and unkind characteristics inherent to Conservatism, while it minimizes the decent, sensible, and attractive qualities.

    Modern "Conservatism" is a malformed, deformed, distorted, twisted, gnarled, mangled, misshapen, hideous representation of true Conservatism.

    And tellingly, its adherents can't tell the difference.

  • ECR Burke, VA
    May 23, 2014 6:51 a.m.

    Outstanding. Thank you for stating the truth in such eloquent and pragmatic terms. Another essay in this morning's paper discusses Senator Hatch's long record of reaching across the aisle to work together for the good of the people. Dare I say that was the mindset of most members of Congress - Democrats and Republicans; liberals and conservatives - until the beginning of this century. Honorable men and women waged honorable battles in the halls of Congress to promote their particular ideology but in the end, it was the American people's interests that they tried to represent. And yes, I will admit, that is an optimistic analysis of days gone by. But I believe the comparison between those those and our current state of affairs relating to our elected officials will show a stark contrast in attitudes and accomplishments. An honest examination of who and what we are, such as this essay offers, will go a long way to resolving some of the ills that currently stop our country from progressing in to the future.

  • Blue Salt Lake City, UT
    May 23, 2014 5:31 a.m.

    "Conservatism... values intelligence, education and high culture."

    Well there's the whopper of the day.

    Try to get a contemporary conservative leader or candidate for high office to talk about the age of our planet or biological evolution and watch them run for the nearest exit.

    They'll fall all over themselves endorsing STEM education, but ask them about global warming and they start spouting gobbledygook.

    High culture? Ask today's GOP leaders how they feel about the NEA and the NEH.

    Face it, today's GOP is fully in the thrall of the Tea Party, a retrograde, fundamentally anti-intellectual movement within which intelligence, education and culture are held in deep contempt.

  • JoeBlow Far East USA, SC
    May 23, 2014 4:03 a.m.

    Wow. Just WOW.

    - this hits every major issue with today's GOP and nails them all PERFECTLY
    - How did she get this in the DN? (I applaud the DN for posting. THey gonna get some pushback)

    "It promotes politicians whose comments constantly offend the educated observer"

    She left out the pettiness that seems to play so well with the base. Palin perfected it and others are now right there.

    Hold up a gun and the crown goes wild
    Question Obamas birth certificate and its a winner
    Threaten nuclear war and get an ovation

    They are easy applause lines and work every time.
    Its like "potty humor" to elementary school kids.

    How about this GOP. Grow up.