Comments about ‘Projected enrollment growth on track to reach '66 by 2020' goal, commissioner says’

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Published: Friday, May 16 2014 4:54 p.m. MDT

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Kings Court
Alpine, UT

The state hasn't put a drop of money into investing in this goal, so I'm not sure how it is going to be done. Maybe constant nagging by politicians will do the trick.

My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

This is a best case scenario they are predicting and likely will be more bleak and discouraging to anyone in college or high school certified students.

The projected tax revenue is not possible nor conceivable by any measure of the economy or income to debt ratios spending exceeding 103% of gross income. Its impossible to imagine any economic growth in the next 40 years and there hasn't been any in the last 40 years. There is no upward mobility and college is not a benefit in a wage-less economy and education has failed its students.

Unemployment is not going up, jobs and job seekers are disappearing from the job market and becoming government dependents. High school children and current college enrollees are becoming street smart finding out that the debts they have will be an albatross on the backs for decades. Don't see any tax revenue from jobs or sales tax so its hard to discern where they got this information, same place they get global warming as a threat, imagination.

Our governor has no visions or wisdom or the ability to recognizes his failures in all things he has done.

Dave T in Ogden
Ogden, UT

According to econ 101, you lower the price of something. You will sell more of that something. Profits to that company will see profits go up to a point. Math will calculate the best price to set for profits to be at its max.
Since Utah is promoting STEM and since setting the right tuition to see max profits is the M in STEM. They ought to lower tuition (prices) to a point for both colleges and students to benefit from this at its best ($$$) point.
Many commercial buildings are sitting empty, including some malls. They could open classroom space at these offices/store fronts. Then as prices are decreased and more students take classes, they could create new classes at these buildings as mentioned. New teaching positions would be created, thus you lower the unemployment rate.
With lower tuition comes with lower student loans, which means students will have more cash to spend on things like new homes, cars, etc. after graduating. Thus you strengthen Utah's economy. Again math will calculate that for every $1 spent on tuition reduction will mean $x increase in the state's tax revenues from increase economic activities.
So please lower the tuition.

Oatmeal
Woods Cross, UT

We could get our universities on board with granting full credit for AP and CE credits earned in the high schools. Currently Utah universities do not consistently recognize and value these sources of college credit. Colleges and universities could also work more closely with public and private high schools in setting pathways for students to resolve all general or liberal education requirements for college degrees while the students are still in high school. The costs to the universities would be minimal, but the monetary and time savings to students and their families would be extraordinary. AP and CE courses also ramps up the academic rigor in the high schools and they give seniors something to work on during that final year.

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