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Comments about ‘Letter: East side sprawls too’

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Published: Tuesday, April 29 2014 12:00 a.m. MDT

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Midvaliean
MIDVALE, UT

It is not really sprawl. The mountain stops further progress. Most of is in those locations can still write Salt Lake City on our mail.

2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Cheris,
I think the difference is.. the sprawl has already happened on the East side, it's in the past, not the future. Growth areas like South Jordan, Riverton, Bluffdale, Harriman, Eagle Mountain, Saratoga Springs... that's where the sprawl is still going on or yet to happen, and we can plan it.

I was talking with the Sandy building inspector years ago and he said there were no new building lots left in Sandy (everything's already been built on). So the NEW sprawl is happening somewhere else now (maybe the areas they mentioned)...

The East side is also very limited on how far the sprawl can go (by the geography). Day Break is a great example of a mistake that could have been prevented IF we had a plan back then. I hope we can prevent mistakes like that in areas that are currently being developed or yet to be developed.

Hank Pym
SLC, UT

re: Midvaliean

Exactly. Limited space negates the concept of sprawl.

The letter writer should work on improving his/her little corner of the world rather than complain, whine, etc...

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "It is not really sprawl."

That's the danger of using disingenuous liberal rhetoric -- sometimes it comes back to bite you.

The ill-defined term "urban sprawl" is just Orwellian newspeak. It's a strawman construct that misrepresents and demonizes truth, making it easier to apply sanctions against it. Or to favor whatever Big Government objective is being advanced.

Reality is, it's not just East-bench collectivist elites that embrace that natural human desire to spread out a little and to own the means of full or partial self-sufficiency. It's a hateful concept when applied to the rest of us, to be sure. It complicates the elitist stranglehold on control of the state. So, they concoct a negative term that their leftist echo chambers assure them will resonate with people. Then define it to exclude themselves.

"All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others."

We're not running out of room in Utah. Along with the rest of the Inter-mountain West, Utah is dang-near empty. Low-density human occupancy is a good idea.

For East-bench elites, and real people, too.

2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT

procuradorfiscal,
We may not be running out of room... but we are running out of water, and clean air (on some days)...

I think community planning is a "good" thing. As long as the PEOPLE in the community (not the politicians)... do the planning.

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "We may not be running out of room... but we are running out of water, and clean air . . . ."

No, we're not. That's just leftist, collectivist propaganda.

Most large Utah aquifers have a hundred-year-plus history of withdrawal, with no, or very little effect on groundwater levels. Even the planned water theft by Las Vegas will have only a small, though locally devastating effect, on levels in the Snake Valley aquifer.

Nationwide, underground freshwater aquifers are estimated to contain as much as 1000 times the content of above-ground freshwater resources. Recently, offshore fresh or near-freshwater aquifers were discovered, containing more than all the water that has been abstracted from all underground aquifers, worldwide, since 1900.

Oceans, a literally unlimited resource, will be readily available as a source of fresh water, as energy production and use technologies are developed in the near future.

And, Utah has plenty of clean air. Even along the Wasatch Front, seasonal, inversion-related concentrations of harmless visible components does not, in any significant way, render air unhealthy, notwithstanding the disingenuous bleating of elitist liberal, anti-business, anti-job activists.

Noodlekaboodle
Poplar Grove, UT

@procuradorfiscal
Utah's population is projected to double by 2030. IDK about you but i'll still be around, and i'm pretty sure i'll be drinking water even then. We don't live in the rain forest, we live in a near desert climate, and it's incredibly short sighted to assume we can waste water the way we do, build a bunch more houses with wasteful landscaping and not face any consequences with a much larger population.

2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT

The amount of area SLC can sprawl to it's east is very limited. I wouldn't even call that sprawl.

But to the South.... and in some areas to the West... it could go on forever...

I think that's what they are trying to get a handle on.

jsf
Centerville, UT

"The East side is also very limited on how far the sprawl can go (by the geography). Day Break is a great example of a mistake that could have been prevented IF we had a plan back then."

I don't know but are not the mountains on the west side of the valley a limit to sprawl also. As far as Day Break, as I recall a lot of planning went into the development maximizing density while still making it livable.

Elitist always complain I was here first, I was right, you are wrong. Like the poster a couple of weeks ago, complained about sprawl, he said he moved to Magna area to escape the urbanization of Salt Lake, then he had to move to Tooele to escape the urbanization of Magna. All because of Urban sprawl. And yet he was the ultimate urban sprawler. I am sure the elitist rural residence of Tooele would have said don't bring your sprawl west. If you think Sandy is done growing, you haven't seen nothing yet.

jsf
Centerville, UT

Noodlekaboodle it is called recycled sewer water, like half our country does.

2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT

jsf,
Sorry... Did I say Day Break... I meant Sun Crest (in Draper/Alpine). Wrong name.

Day Break was pretty well planned. But I think a master plan could have prevented urban sprawl spreading to the tops of the mountains in the south east part of the valley (like SunCrest) and some of the problems they have experienced there and on the Draper benches (like fire danger, landslides, schools, etc).

Noodlekaboodle
Poplar Grove, UT

@JSF
I'm perfectly aware of grey water, but even with grey water if we continue to build houses on .25 acre lots, with Kentucky Bluegrass, and we have to water them everyday, or the grass will die, then ya, we are going to run out of water. I mean sure it would be fun to keep using and using until our only options are expensive, as we don't have the time to implement less extreme options. Or we can keep doing what we're doing, until it's too late and we don't have a choice but to spend a lot of money to do something drastic(ie, Las Vegas paid people to tear out their lawns) instead of something like that why not just require new homes have pre approved grass or native landscaping?

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