Comments about ‘Dick Harmon: BYU running back Jamaal Williams to make debut on track team’

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Published: Thursday, April 24 2014 3:10 p.m. MDT

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Stop The Nonsense
El Paso, TX

Jamaal, please please please don't pull a hamstring!

Tom in CA
Vallejo, CA

Running track will help Williams be in shape for football. No doubt about it. Go for it Jamaal!

mba latino
Herriman, UT

"but most successful sprinters have thinner, more efficient bodies." the Author obviously doesn't know what he is talking about. If you see any world class sprinter, they have a body building type physique. The muscle helps them with their push off the blocks and upper body strength is very important as well. The longer the distance the runner competes the thinner the body usually is. Please do some research before hand.

Cougsndawgs
West Point , UT

So my obvious question: Why isn't Michael Davis running the 100 meter or relay? 10.58 is a good time at the collegiate level and with training he could get that down to at least a 10.3.

Dick Harmon

MBA Latino... Here's some research for you... There is muscle bulk and then muscle bulk. The big snag for a football player like Jamaal is the overdevelopment of the quadriceps muscle groups and not enough development of hamstrings. Leg extensions are more popular in a weight room than lower leg curls. If there is not a good developmental balance then the quads overpower the hamstrings-which is not hard to do because there is more muscle mass in the quads. The net effect as the hamstrings fatigue in someone without good balance, is a hamstring pull. Hamstring injury is far more catastrophic than a blown knee because the torn muscle heals with a non-contractile scar making it more vulnerable to re-injury.

Cougsndawgs
West Point , UT

Nice to see DH come in with comments. Just to add...muscle mass isn't a requisite for speed, just ask Usane Bolt. Long and lean seems to be just fine with the right training...or maybe it's his last name that provides some magic?

Sprinters also perform exercises that work the tendons in the feet and ankles as well as the hips and upper arms. It's about strength and flexibility, not about mass. Taking a few kinesiology courses also goes a long way mba Latino.

UU32
Bountiful, UT

Ben Johnson had a lot of muscle mass, Carl Lewis didn't. I guess we call this a draw?

Old Ricks Coach
Rexburg, ID

Elite 100 meter sprinters do not always have thinner bodies, leaner yes. More muscle equals less fat. Full Squats and different variations of dead lifting are much more efficient than leg extensions or hamstring curls could ever be. Single joint movements do not equate with increased speed. Multi joint exercises are the key. The biggest key is that he needs time on the track. Running in football and pure sprinting are not the same. He needs to do a lot of block work and sprinting. Once his body makes the adjustments, the added muscle mass often works in your favor, not against it. Take a look at the NCAA or Olympic 100 meter finals, men or women, and then decide what a sprinter's body looks like in this day and age.

2-Bit
Ogden, UT

Have you ever seen Yohan Blake? I'm pretty dang sure Jamaal isn't going to have problems with muscles slowing him down if guys like Yohan can compete at the world's highest level.

Krispy Zadoosh
Salt Lake, UT

Any college weight program that is still using leg extensions and leg curls should fire their strength coach.

fibonacci2112
Langley, VA

Best of luck to Jamaal. He definitely has a God given talent. I'm just excited DH pulled out Golden Richards from the past. Golden was fast!!!! Too bad he didn't play when throwing the ball was in vogue.

Alpiner
Alpine, UT

Didn't he run today in the prelims? How did he do?

idablu
Idaho Falls, ID

He ran an 11.1 which was in the lowest 3rd of the field. He came out of the blocks pretty well but was then passed up.
He was on the 4X100 but kind of slowed them up a bit, recording a much slower time than they usually do.

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