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Comments about ‘U. student government passes resolution to change fight song’

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Published: Tuesday, April 22 2014 10:06 p.m. MDT

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Ifel Of'a-sofa
Alpine, Utah

looks like one of the local schools is losing their identity...
1st the football team went south, then the basketball team became the schools flagship sport...
then the fight song is being changed, and I am sure the mascot will follow shortly...

no big deal though... they don't really care about tradition anyway...

LOL

Obama10
SYRACUSE, UT

1st World problems.

Shawnm750
West Jordan, UT

The song changes still have to be approved by the University President and Board of Trustees, the Alumni and the entire student body...so hopefully those groups combined will have enough sense to not change it without a real discussion. Sorry, but student government is kind of a joke, especially at the collegiate level. Rather than actually representing the student body, it serves more to look good on a resume.

So, congratulations Sam Ortiz! Now you can tell future employers how effective you were in getting this resolution passed, and how you fought for equality and civility during your administration (whether or not the song actually gets changed or not...)

Tajemnica
West Valley, Utah

Chris B where have you been? I have missed you so. Good to see you on here again. Batman is nothing without the Joker. Tom is nothing without Jerry. Spiderman is nothing without the green goblin. The Red Sox are nothing without the Yankees...and I am nothing without you. (Although for once I agree with your opinion.)

DraperUteFan
Draper, UT

How does one small student government get to change a song that impacts tens of thousands of alumni and Ute fans?

I'm really not that upset about the change, my daughter has attended games with me for years and often asked why the song was "Utah man" as it was mildly annoying to her as a diehard Ute fan.

What bothers me most is student government alone should not be allowed to make this change. A board of alumni, faculty, the board of regents, and others should have a vote in this process. Teenage kids and young adults who are only a small part of the U of U community should not be making decisions in a vacuum.

iron&clay
RIVERTON, UT

I have heard from objective observers that the BYU coeds were the fairest of them all.

Howard S.
Taylorsville, UT

The coed line has been changed before... It used to be maidens not coeds.

That line can be easily changed to "... our scholars are the brightest and each one's a shining star..."

Leave "man" alone... It's gender generic as in mankind.

USAlover
Salt Lake City, UT

I'm actually more troubled by the fact we drive on "parkways" and park on "driveways". Things like this need to be changed (note:sarcasm)

DeepBlue
Anaheim, CA

iron&clay

"I have heard from objective observers that the BYU coeds were the fairest of them all."

And brightest!

Business Insider: April 2, 2014

"25 Colleges Where Students Are Both Hot And Smart"

#1 - BYU
#15 - BYU-Idaho

Maybe BYU and Utah could trade... nah, silly idea!

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Must be really slow on the hill nowadays if the only thing worth discussing is political correctness.

NT
SomewhereIn, UT

How about asking the hundreds of thousands of alumni - and donors - how they would vote on this matter. Shouldn't they all have an "equal" vote?

Schnee
Salt Lake City, UT

@Blue Collar
"How in the world is " a Utah man am I " divisive?"

Half the school can't even sing it without being factually wrong at that phrase.

pleblian
salt lake city, utah

This decision by the student government really just highlights how superfluous they are.

They put forth nothing of substance for the well-being of the student body and effect no pressue on the University of Utah to address real issues such as tuition increases, majors that do not lead to employment, and debt education.

They just want to pad a resume with fluff.

Dante
Salt Lake City, UT

I regret that this silly, PC issue has divided our University community. Some traditions are worth perpetuating. I'm weary of re-writing history and tradition to suit the endlessly offended. However this question is resolved, many alumni donors will feel either a rush of pride or a twinge of resentment every time they stand to sing at the games they attend. Appreciation opens more wallets than resentment.

Marked it Down
Park City, UT

USAlover

I'm more troubled by oxymoronic terms like "giant shrimp".

btw, this is nothing new; the Utes have been talking about changing their fight song since the 80's and they already changed their nickname.

Mtn Tracker
Ephraim, UT

To all those who say they are no longer donating to the U because of this. Don't worry, the PAC 12 and it's schools totally agree with this change. Schools the pac 12 represent have all made changes like this as well. Your schools is in good hands.

pocyUte
Pocatello, ID

Some things are stupid, some things are idiotic.

This is both

Andy
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Mr. Ortiz should note how divisive changing the song is to the alumni. No one is in favor of it.

I'm not sure why, but the U student body is intent on offending the alumni. I recall Jon Huntsman being ridiculed in the Daily Chronicle for being selected to speak at graduation. As I recall it was because he is LDS. Mr. Huntsman actually had to defend his good name and note for the school that he had never been treated so poorly as he had at the U. Pathetic.

The If we really want to improve the U we should significantly shrink the humanities and soft science departments and spend funds on research. More productive and less controversy.

Christine B. Hedgefog
Salt Lake City, UT

Just the latest attempt to divert attention away from another bowl less football season and K Whit's final season as head coach.

Chris B's momma
Idaho Falls, ID

You changed the mascot to a bird. Why not just do bird calls for your fight song?

Boo in Boston
Boston, MA

Solomon Levi must be spinning in his grave, tra-la-la-la-la!

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