Comments about ‘Striking a balance: Moab's future hinges on energy and recreation’

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Published: Tuesday, April 15 2014 10:35 a.m. MDT

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Elwood P. Suggins
BEAVERTON, OR

I believe most people would like the BLM to get their B (along with their L and M), out of here. And this dude mentioned should have never left Chicago.

Happy Valley Heretic
Orem, UT

Aren't we still paying for a super site clean-up there at Moab?
Is that what the "Grand Bargain" is for Bishop, strip the land of it's resources and leave the cost to clean it up on the people, again.

tears
Bozeman, MT

Good points in the article. It is sad, however, that there is continuing to be the desire to frack, scrape, dig, mangle, and pound the land for minerals, etc that will be sold on the open market. There is nothing good for all of the natural land in the extraction industry.
Be smart, not short sighted. Once blasted and mined it will take hundreds of years for the land to recover. No more mining.

My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

Once before the Moab area had high hopes and dreams of becoming an industrial mining area from the late 1947 to the 1950's by mining uranium in the region. The market crashed and so did Utah and hundreds of people who invested tens of thousands of dollars. It crashed and cost Utah many years of job losses and financial collapse spending funding for years in advance, just like today's irresponsible legislators and kickback millionaires.

Herbert is setting up our barren landscape to another tragedy and failure and more damaging environmental dangers than the uranium mining industry left behind with damage measure in 50,000 year half life contamination.

The oil industry is high risk out of sight, out of mind, built in deniability of environmental damage by fracking and destroying the subterranean structure with millions of pounds of bunker buster bombs many miles below and hundreds of miles around the blast.

Any where in this country the damage has become news and scientific fact, gases escaping from fracture mining burn blue in pastures and food producing farms, and water aquifers turns brown and toxic and unusable or drinkable. Only oil companies and legislators will profit from the destruction they approve.

Moab Jim
Pahrump, NV

None of the three Grand County land use plans is "more protectionist of land resources". If Grand County ignores the public's stated desire for conservation of land, water and minerals, as all three plans currently do, where is the balance in that? All three Grand County plan alternatives rely on the fatally flawed Utah Recreational Land Exchange Act of 2009 (URLEA). For example, Parcel 32, destined for Utah/SITLA control and development was appraised as "grazing land", which clearly it will not be. For Grand County to use the flawed URLEA adds insult to injury in Greater Canyonlands and should stop before it is too late.

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