Comments about ‘Childhood obesity is pretty pricey, research says’

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Published: Monday, April 7 2014 11:42 p.m. MDT

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Baron Scarpia
Logan, UT

It is so frustrating to hear Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity/Fox News criticize Michelle Obama's work on childhood health and fitness, particularly when child obesity impacts the poorer minorities harder, and creates a more significant burden on their health and well-being.

Government subsidizes junk foods -- think corn (for high-fructose corn syrup), sugar, etc., and you have fast food giants, such as McDonald's, squeezing farmers to produce their potatoes and beef at cheaper and cheaper levels to support "dollar meals," a common staple for the working poor, consisting of French fries and fat burgers. Indeed, many grocery stores often leave poorer communities because they can't compete with the dollar meals offered by prevalent fast food outlets.

Bottom line is that there are too many economic incentives for junk food, making them cheap and overly available to the masses who put nutrition behind eating cheap. Healthy foods have become a "luxury."

What America needs is a strong health movement among the working/lower ranks of society to avert this obesity crisis.

RedShirtCalTech
Pasedena, CA

To "Baron Scarpia" the fact is that if Michelle Obama really wanted to do something about abesity she could. With nearly 50 million people receiving SNAP benefits, they could do something about obesity.

Did you know that with an SNAP benefit card you can buy sodas, cookies, ice-cream, pizza from Papa Murphy's, hot dogs from 7-11, and all sorts of other unhealthy meals. If Michelle Obama really was concerned about obesity why not start with the group that has the highest rates, the poor. More specifically, the poor that are getting government assistance.

Why not restrict SNAP benefits to fresh fruits, vegetables, limited quantities of meat, milk, and the other things that Michelle says we should eat.

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