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Comments about ‘In our opinion: Mozilla makes a mockery of diversity and freedom’

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Published: Friday, April 4 2014 1:56 p.m. MDT

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AZKID
Mapleton, UT

Let me be the first to state my hearty approval of this opinion piece. Well stated, DN. Well stated.

Now, queue the supposedly "tolerant" left, to jump all over this opinion piece as being "intolerant". Who, pray tell, are the intolerant ones?

Rufio
Saratoga, UT

In a blog post Thursday, Mozilla's executive chairwoman, Mitchell Baker, apologized for Mr. Eich's appointment, writing, "We have employees with a wide diversity of views. Our culture of openness extends to encouraging staff and community to share their beliefs and opinions in public…"

All true, until the belief or opinion is not aligned with the liberal agenda. No longer does the fact of skills or knowledge mean equal opportunity but we must now face the bigotry of the left.

Henry Drummond
San Jose, CA

Can't disagree on this one. When BYU fired a professor for writing an editorial criticizing the LDS Church's stand on Proposition 8 there was an outcry. Where are they now? How is this any different?

gee-en
Salt Lake City, UT

Excellent, excellent article.

YGradFan
CENTERVILLE, UT

I agree wholeheartedly with this opinion. The LGBT community and those that support their push for same sex marriage rights expect you to conform with what they want. But if you don't and you show support for the other side, they do whatever they can to force you out. They want tolerance for their cause, but are not willing to show it in return.

There is no reason that Eich should have been forced out. His support for traditional marriage was not linked in any way to Mozilla. He has a right to show support for one side or the other, without it affecting his employment. Does this mean I can go ahead and force one of my employees to resign if they support SSM?

Wonder
Provo, UT

Do I think he should have been forced to resign? No. Do I think this opinion is hypocritical? Yes. Why is it acceptable for a company to reflect its values by refusing to allow insurance coverage for contraceptives but it is "totalitarian" for a company to expect its senior employee to act in a way that complies with its values? And by the way, this is not state action, so comparing it to totalitarian governments is way over the top. You can't just be for "freedom" when the freedom is something you like and be against it when the freedom is something you dislike or you are as hypocritical as the "liberals" you are complaining about. And before anyone says I that I am also a hypocrite because I think he should have been fired, please reread the first 2 sentences I wrote.

splitme2
West Jordan, UT

I too agree with this article. When I read about Eich a couple of days ago I thought it was very sad. Maybe he just didn't want to stay somewhere that preaches one thing and lives another. Do as I say, not as I do.

strangethingintheland
Morristown, NJ

I thought most employers had a policy of non-discrimination based on religion. I'm not saying that Eich's support of Prop 8 was religiously based, but I can certainly imagine prospective employees being in that situation. Is this a message to them that they need not apply for employment? At a minimum, it sounds like a potentially hostile work environment.

Th article mentions that Eich is the author of Javascript and hence has some technical credentials. My understanding is that he was in fact a co-founder of the company. If true, the irony seems even deeper, as many founders seek to instill their values in their company. To be found inconsistent with the values of a company one founded, even though one has held the same position throughout, seems the height of absurdity.

Sports Are Great
Salt Lake City, UT

Henry Drummond,

You're comparing apples to oranges there pal. The firefox CEO didn't criticize his employer. You really had to stretch to try and make that comparison work. Sorry, I know you wanted to take a dig there, but it failed.

2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT

It's a sad day when $1000 can cost you your whole career. Joseph McCarthy really would be proud.

A private $1000 donation... cost him his whole career (because of intolerance of opinions that don't match with theirs)... That's just sad.

He's not the first. He's just the latest to be picked off and had careers destroyed by these radicals who can't tolerate anybody who wasn't on their side on Prop 8.

Cougsndawgs
West Point , UT

I could understand Mozilla forcing him out if he made anti gay statements or showed bigotry in hiring or promotion/evaluation processes, but forcing him out because he supported a political side over another? What's next, fire a person who is affiliated with conservative organizations or votes for tea party candidates? Disgraceful Mizolla...guess who isn't getting any of my business in the future?

I'm a tolerant individual, and have made clear on comment boards that I feel gay and lesbian individuals should be allowed to marry. I don't feel it's my right to tell them morally how to live their lives, as long as their choices don't infringe on my rights, which I don't think SSM does. I don't lay this at the feet of the LGBT community because many of them are not hostile or aggressive in their position. I'm proud to call many of them my friends. I lay this at the feet of the liberal agenda who have chosen "diversity" as a clarion call for preferential treatment instead of civil rights, and exclusion of ideas for groupthink mentality. That's right, "diversity" so we can discriminate.

williams64
Palo Alto, CA

I take great exception to the last paragraph of this article. This has NOTHING to do with the legal concepts of liberty and freedom. Eich still has the legal freedom to say whatever he wants. No one can take that away. But freedom is not a guarantee that there will not be consequences to your actions. What we have here is a case of cultural norms of behavior evolving in a way that is gradually making an anti-gay marriage stance the public equivalent of being against interracial marriage. There's legally nothing to stop a person from financing an effort to make interracial marriage illegal, but it's well understood that the result is going to be public shaming. That's where we're headed with an anti-gay marriage stance. So while it may bother you that cultural norms are shifting in a way that you don't like, you kind of just have to deal with it. Just as you have the freedom to say what you want, other people have the freedom to shame you for it.

2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Wonder,
Re: "And by the way, this is not state action, so comparing it to totalitarian governments is way over the top"...

I think I can see where he's coming from. It doesn't have to be a State sponsored thing to be likened to how other totalitarian regimes acted in history. Krystallnacht was not a state sponsored thing. It was when civilians intolerant of Jews went out to bashed their Jewish neighbors... and the state just watched.

Kristallnacht, was a series of coordinated attacks against Jews throughout Nazi Germany and parts of Austria on 9–10 November 1938, carried out by non-Jewish civilians. German authorities looked on without intervening. The name Kristallnacht comes from the shards of broken glass that littered the streets after Jewish-owned stores, buildings, and synagogues had their windows smashed.

The intolerance and the state just watching... is the similarity. It doesn't have to be "state sponsored".

His only crime was a political contribution... and this is what he gets??

Joseph McCarthy really would be proud.

Deanvrtc
Vancouver, WA

Williams64 has stated the lefts position perfectly...and they are very good at it, as most media gives them a bully pulpit. He states.."Just as you have the freedom to say what you want, other people have the freedom to shame you for it". Well said Williams64...exactly what the left has been doing for a long time. Its sad when someone has to "shame" a person into silence about a dissenting moral opinion.
Perhaps those who share Eichs opinion, need to stand behind him, so the "lefts" perceived shame will turn into a rightful congratulations!

williams64
Palo Alto, CA

2 bits,

You're seriously comparing a man being shamed out of a CEO position by the internet with Kristallnacht? There is no comparison. None. The actions taken during Kristallnact were violent and illegal. Against the law. That is, for the state to stand by and do nothing was for the state to abandon the law. By contrast, today we have a company yielding to public opinion, expressed non-violently and through entirely legal means. No laws are being broken, so the state has no reason to get involved. Again, there is no comparison.

McCarthy was a representative of the government misusing state power to lead a witch-hunt. There is no similar politician leading investigations against individuals who are opposed to gay marriage. Just because you think someone is being unfairly treated in both cases doesn't mean the situation is the same. It's not the same. It's not even remotely the same.

anotherview
SLO, CA

re:2bits
"I think I can see where he's coming from. It doesn't have to be a State sponsored thing to be likened to how other totalitarian regimes acted in history. Krystallnacht was not a state sponsored thing. It was when civilians intolerant of Jews went out to bashed their Jewish neighbors... and the state just watched."

The comparison to and oversimplification of Jewish persecution is (and citing Joseph McCarthy) is over-the-top. Preceding Kyrstallnacht there was a long propaganda campaign--by Hitler--blaming the Jews for Germany's defeat in WWI and the subsequent economic depression. There were also ever increasing restrictions on German Jews. The Brown Shirts--a paramilitary Nazi organization participated in Krystallnacht.

williams64
Palo Alto, CA

Deanvrtc,

You're of course quite correct. But the left has never been the sole distributors of public shame so to phrase it as the left has "been doing it for a long time" is kind of misleading. It's more like, everyone does it and has done it and gets mad when it happens to them. I'm simply pointing out reality. The right loves to trumpet freedom and liberty when their positions are under attack, as this article does, but that is misleading. Liberty and freedom are not under threat as a result of Eich being outsted, and to make that claim is to devalue those concepts to the point of meaninglessness. Stick to the facts. Yes, a person is being subjected to very public shame over a private belief. It's regrettable but this has happened countless times to people of all political persuasions throughout history. Lets talk about that issue and not make this into something it's not.

2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Kinda reminds me of the guy who got his hillbilly show suspended for talking about his religious beliefs in a magazine article and offending the same community. And they claim to be the tolerant ones...

===

Here's the irony....

You don't like being fired from your job for being gay... but you support firing someone for donating to prop-8 political campaign?? That seems VERY inconsistent..

====

Not only do you not want to be fired for being gay... you want LAWS preventing employers from firing you!

You can't really run around firing people for not supporting prop-8... and then want laws to protect you!

===

And before somebody goes there... I'm NOT for firing people for being gay. I'm just pointing out the hypocrisy.

Maybe we need a law preventing gay people from firing people for not supporting Prop-8??

===

Wait a minute... I just read that he donated to Pat Buchanan's campaign and more... I take it all back. In that case, what happened was TOTALLY justified!

Bob K
portland, OR

2 bits
Cottonwood Heights, UT
"It's a sad day when $1000 can cost you your whole career. Joseph McCarthy really would be proud.
A private $1000 donation... cost him his whole career (because of intolerance of opinions that don't match with theirs)... That's just sad."

A-- it did not cost him his career. It cost him a job that he himself made untenable.

B-- because he refuses to say that his catholic church was wrong, and contributing to the cause it espoused is wrong, he can have any job there except boss.

People do not deserve to work for a man who sticks to a belief that took away their rights.

It is NO different than if he contributed to the "take away the lds tax exemption" even though he had mormon employees

Open your eyes, folks!

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

I agree with the article. Freedom is for us all, in equal doses. Mozilla should have rode this out, just like honey maid did with their 'love' campaign.

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