Comments about ‘IV fluid shortage felt in medical centers’

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Published: Sunday, March 30 2014 3:13 p.m. MDT

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Igualmente
Mesa, AZ

As a result of increased FDA oversight... More government bureaucracy overwhelming industry. This cradle to grave government meddling in free enterprise is going to destroy this country and its healthcare system.

The endless appointment of czars for this and that, with hundreds on staff has grown the government to an enormous size. And these government workers aren't just happy with their fat salary..they intend to work also! I say put in your twenty, and leave business alone. Don't go trying to fix things that aren't broke.

Kings Court
Alpine, UT

A shortage of IV solution? That is simply salt water. That is ridiculous. This has nothing to do with regulations. This is about the private sector creating artificial shortages to drive up the price. Last year, it was reported that one supplier who has a monopoly on IV solution drove the cost from .84 cents a bag to almost $90 a bag. People were seeing ridiculous costs for IV solution on their hospital bills. This pattern of corporate behavior began with the artificial electricity shortages in California during the 1990's and they've popped up ever since, enriching the very corporations that created the fake shortage. I think it is time to bring back some government regulations because this de-regulation kick we've been on is costing us dearly.

DN Subscriber
Cottonwood Heights, UT

@ Kings Court above-

If it is the nasty private sector hiking prices to make a killing (which I think is most certainly NOT the case) then Mr. Kings Court is missing out a wonderful opportunity to get into the IV solution business (or California electrical supply business) and start producing IV solution and electricity and selling it for a modest profit above his costs, vastly undercutting the greedy monopoly suppliers, and doing a civic good deed.

Once he is actually in the business, and subject to the whims and roadblocks of the regulators, perhaps he will decide that those are not fields he wants to remain in.

A vast amount of all medical costs are driven by two factors- government regulations and the unrestrained trial lawyers who drive up costs, drive out competition, adding huge costs with no additional value.

Well done to Huntsman and the other facilities making prudent rationing decisions. This is just a drop in the bucket compared to the rationing of care that will be the end result of Obamacare.

el steve o
Herriman, UT

I've seen first hand how an avalanche of common drug shortages have started happening all of the sudden, like someone flipped a switch. No one really has a straight answer about why? Seriously, there used to be a shortage of one or two common, basic required day to day medicines, here and there, and then about 1- 2 years ago - an avalanche of shortages.

I've heard the "greedy drug company is to blame" story, but I'm no buying it. Something happened and I believe it's all related to increased FDA regulatory and oversight environment. And manufacturers are keeping their mouths shut about the bullying regulatory environment that they suddenly find themselves in, so as not to bring increased scrutiny and possible retaliation from the said regulatory agencies. Beauracracy run wild, to create an environment that will cause the public to beg "big govt" to step in and nationalize everything.

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

To "Kings Court" sorry, but you are wrong. The article was quite clear when they stated ""Increased FDA regulatory oversight and industry recalls have place a strain on manufacturers' ability to produce and supply unlimited quantities of IV solutions". You can thank Obama and his regulations for creating the shortage. If you look on the Internet there are quite a few articles about how Obama's policies have cost businesses billions of dollars to comply with new regulations.

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