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Comments about ‘Bountiful man speaks out after dismissal of child sex abuse charges’

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Published: Wednesday, March 26 2014 10:04 p.m. MDT

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klr56
Kent, WA

Should law enforcement look into the allegations made by this young woman? Isn't there a law about lying under oath?

fourfunsons
Calgary, 00

"Whether or not the witness is lying, that's not the issue here," she said. "It's the evidence that would have come forward at trial that I think would have affected the ability to get a conviction at trial."

So, it doesn't matter at all that the witness lied under oath? New evidence would have come forward, had their been a trial, which would have shown she'd lied and would have affected the ability to get a conviction? Am I reading everything wrong?

What kind of Prosecuting Attorney says that a witness lying under oath is not an issue? Of course, it's an issue. Make it the issue! If there'd been a trial, new evidence would have come forward that might have prevented a conviction of this man, so she got the case dismissed? That man's life has been damaged in so many areas - find that young woman and make her own up to her charges. Let her have a little prison time for wasting the Court's time. Let me know if I'm reading this story incorrectly.

LovelyDeseret
Gilbert, AZ

This is devastating. I worry about this as we become over vigilant in our quest to protect children especially girls from sexual predators. In a large sense, this man's life is ruined. We will never know the complete truth so he will have this hang over him like a guilty man.

Bob K
portland, OR

I noticed, about 15 items down the page from this, the DN article saying the charges were dismissed, with the mug show of this poor man.

Perhaps an apology to him from the DN, and an investigative article about why the prosecutor refused to admit her case was overblown, and possibly based on lies?

There is too much actual abuse, but there is also way too much ruination of reputations (usually a man's) over false abuse charges, including in divorce cases.

CP
Tooele, UT

I am sorry for what this man and his family has had to endure. Unfortunately the damage that young woman did has been done. And I am not surprised that she moved out of state, but I still feel that in some way she should pay restitution to this man and his family, especially since all they wanted to do was help her. What a shame, can't say as I blame him for not wanting to help anyone after getting burned like he did. I hope he and his family can heal and find closure after this ordeal.

Mark from Montana
Davis County, UT

Based on the prosecutor's statement, I think the state should be looking at both law enforcement and the prosecutor's office to see why the case was so badly mishandled. Too many of our public 'servants' are simply out to make a name for themselves and care little for the truth.

I know it. I Live it. I Love it.
Provo, UT

Mr. Green,

You said you "don't want that to be the takeaway at all." regarding not pursuing criminals and the message this brings.

Well I have a message for you...

You likewise should not take away something. Children do need help and this absolutely doesn't mean you have to avoid being near children out of paranoia. I doubt anyone wouldn't understand why if you didn't. But I would hope you might take a different message away from this... cover yourself.

It's unrealistic and perhaps not very fair to suggest that someone carry a camera with them wherever they go. But technically, it would help, no? Well, perhaps employing simpler things like a phone constantly having gps tracking on it, and other methods. I'm not saying loose yourself in paranoia "covering yourself" techniques. All I'm saying is if a few simple practices can provide you with a constant alibi, then that is better than wanting to avoid real-life situations because of this mislead affair.

I'm not pretending to have an answer, but life can go on. That's a fact. The question is how you do move forward, not whether you should.

sherlock1
cache, UT

This is unbelievable! This prosecutor should be immediately fired! They have ruined this guys life. How does he ever get his life back? He will always be viewed with suspicion where ever he goes. The State should be liable for his 100,000 dollars in legal expenses. How can the prosecutor possible say to a reporter that the truth does not matter in the court. "Whether the girl is lying is not the issue, we did not feel we could win at trial" so even though they knew the girl was lying they still would have put this guy away for the next 15 years. Fire her now!!! This is the epitome prosecutor abuse.

BU52
Provo, ut

Sounds like the justice system isn't very just. Sad to see an individual's life ruined based on the lies and fabrications of another. He probably shouldn't have been arrested until some actual evidence had been obtained. But as our country continues to spy on its own citizens and disregard the 4th amendment this will probably be a useful tool for the government that used to be of, for, and by the people.

Thomas Smith
Sandy, UT

klr56--
My experience is that law Enforcement acts in behalf of the first party allegations in order to "protect the innocent", and assume that the court will determine the truth (justice will be served). The DA and Courts presume that LE is accurate and correct, and the jury (including your neighbors and friends) approach the entire affair with the attitude that if you are charged then you are guilty. It is a very difficult process to stop, and even eventually "winning" innocence, there is no compensation for attorney fees, bonding expenses, jail time, loss of employment, loss of family members that also believed the police report, court time and expense, etc. Then consider the plea bargain: The defendant is fearful while no one can predict what the jury will do, so your "confession" to limit jail and cost often convicts the innocent. I cannot tell that there is any cost to the accuser.

RG
Buena Vista, VA

"Ortega maintains the case was dismissed because new evidence surfaced through pretrial hearings indicating the prosecution might not be successful in a trial.

"Whether or not the witness is lying, that's not the issue here," she said. "It's the evidence that would have come forward at trial that I think would have affected the ability to get a conviction at trial."

The witness lying is "not the issue?" If that isn't an important issue, I don't know what is!

Prosecution might not be "successful?" Is this just a way of saying they knew they were wrong and didn't want to admit it? Sounds like that to me.

hamaca
Baton Rouge, LA

"Whether or not the witness is lying, that's not the issue here," she said.

That's a bit concerning.

Stop The Nonsense
El Paso, TX

What an unfortunate story. I guess the old saying "Let no good deed go unpunished" applies in this case. I think the girl needs to undergo a psychiatric evaluation. If she passes, she needs to be prosecuted for lying under oath. If she fails, she needs to be detained in a psych ward so she doesn't hurt anyone else.

ECR
Burke, VA

The Japanese government released a prisoner yesterday who had been on death row for 48 years. It finally came to light, after 48 years, that police had acted improperly and prosecutors were hell bent on consisting someone regardless of evidence. When over zealous prosecutions or investigations ruin a mob's (a family's) life, there should be consequences to follow. Everyone should be responsible for their actions. Who will give the japanese prisoner his lost life back to him? Who will make restitution for the harm done to this man's reputation and his ability to provide for his family. Charges were dropped but suspicions will always remain.

pacnwmom
Vancouver, WA

This happened to a man here in the NW accused of victimizing a child in his Primary class--during Sharing Time--who was very careful never to be alone with a student or any female (allegedly molested her in a room full of children and adults). The entire ward was tainted by the Stake President calling him a sinner publicly right after his arrest. The child's story changed and grew over the course of the pre-trial period (obviously coached by mom, who had been a victim as a young person). He was not a wealthy man and could not hire a good lawyer and was convicted even though the accusations were ridiculous to anyone who'd served in Primary. He is a good kind man who is ministering to others in prison. I'm so glad this man didn't share the same fate.

Old Scarecrow
Brigham City, UT

This story is very troubling. The "related story" from last July was so detailed and certain, Mr. Green was virtually convicted in that news account.

We will never know if there was any substance to the teen-ager's claims, but adults, especially men, are too vulnerable and almost defenseless to charges like those described in the July 2013 news article. The police probably responded appropriately to the original charges, and the prosecutors did their jobs, as well. But greater care should be taken by courts, police and especially media not to ruin a person's life when the claims are as yet unproven.

Jamescmeyer
Midwest City, USA, OK

I've been in a similar spot in my own family over similar problems. Fortunately in our case it didn't go on for so long. Because of it, however, I do feel the pressure of trying to maintain a balance on the matter; we have to stop abuse against children, but we CAN NOT abuse innocents on the false accusations of children-especially not children knowingly and willingly departing from a normal, healthy family structure.

Granted, all I know of this case is what's said in this one article here. Assuming it is true, however, she's done a life-affecting disservice to other abandoned youth who genuinely desire and seek help, particularly through adoption.

DN Subscriber
Cottonwood Heights, UT

This is a case of criminal misconduct by the girl making false charges, and a state official who refuses to recognize that lies and false charges require swift dismissal of all charges.

The next story should be about the resignation of the prosecutor, and the filing of criminal charges against the false accuser. She is 18 now, so name her and let people in her new location be warned of her attempt to destroy a good and decent man (and his family) who did nothing worse than to attempt to help a troubled teen.

Mr. Green's persecution by the media and an overzealous prosecutor should be a stark warning that our justice system has been toppled by the corrosive effects of political correctness. Unsubstantiated allegation misconduct is automatically accepted as irrefutable proof of criminal conduct.

One comment above suggested Mr. Green is paranoid, but you are not paranoid if someone is actually out to get you, and the story proves that. No amount of defensive action can prove a negative, so Mr. Green must be forgive his prudent refusal to have anything to do with coaching, mentoring, or tutoring.

Sue the prosecutor and the accuser for his legal fees!

Bdamajd
Centerville, UT

This is very sad!"

When asked whether all charges were dropped because of doubt about the girl's story, prosecutor Cristina Ortega responded with a firm and simple, "No."

Ortega maintains the case was dismissed because new evidence surfaced through pretrial hearings indicating the prosecution might not be successful in a trial.

"Whether or not the witness is lying, that's not the issue here," "It's the evidence that would have come forward at trial that I think would have affected the ability to get a conviction at trial."

So Christina Ortega didn't doubt the girl's story, she just didn't think she could win the case? So winning the case is more important than the truth? Christina Ortega should be sharply reprimanded with the warning if anything like this ever happens again she will be fired and not be able to practice law any more. I believe in second chances. If this is more than the first time this has happened, she should be fired immediately and lose her PRIVILEGE to practice law!

DonO
Draper, UT

The accuser needs to be held accountable for what she has done to this man and his family. It's concerning to me that the prosecutor in the case apparently plans to just let the whole thing drop. Mr. Green, the victim, may choose to do nothing to the accuser but the "legal system" certainly should.

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